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"Dear Samantha and your kids, John, Kelly, Hannah
I would like to invite you all to visit........"

In this invitation letter Samantha is being invited with her kids John Kelly and Hannah.
I want to write the the underlined sentence with correct grammar and in a formal way.
Please guide me. I am confused in using comma after kids and then mentioning their names.
What would be the correct way of writing this with respect to writing "your kids" and then mentioning their names.
Thanks

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Quote

Just write it this way.

Samantha knows they are her kids, so you don't need to tell her. Emotion: wink

Dear Samantha. John, Kelly and Hannah,
I would like to invite you all to visit........

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I was hoping to mention kids and their names at the starting of the letter without starting it on a different paragraph. Why? What I suggested was the standard, common and natural approach.


If you want to write it this way, go ahead. The officials will understand your meaning.

"Dear Samantha and your children kids, John, Kelly and Hannah,
I would like to invite you all to visit........"

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Comments  
Clive Quote

Just write it this way.

Samantha knows they are her kids, so you don't need to tell her.

Dear Samantha. John, Kelly and Hannah,
I would like to invite you all to visit........

It's an invitation letter to visit Canada for Samantha and her kids. But the officer reading this letter will not know they are her kids, to whom she will pass this letter.
So I need a punctuation mark or something which will mention kids and then open up their names.
Thanks for your reply.

Dear Samantha,
I would like to invite you and your children John, Kelly and Hannah, to visit........

Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies

That's one way of adding them. Thanks Clive
I was hoping to mention kids and their names at the starting of the letter without starting it on a different paragraph.

 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.