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Hi everybody,
I have some problems with using commas. I´m not sure if these sentences are punctuated correctly. Could you please check them?

1. With its 2,413m, it was the largest suspension bridge in Europe.

2. Those who prefer hiking can climb up Arthur´s Seat offering a breathtaking view of Edinburgh, or Calton Hill to see the monuments situated atop.

3. You can return via Broad Street, which used to be the centre of the medieval town and the marketplace.

Margaret´s Chapel, dating back to the 12th century, is the oldest edifice in the castle area.

5. Walking along, you will see a lot of tall narrow houses called „lands“ which were built in the 17th century.

6. The present structure contains several rooms demonstrating Scott´s passion for Scottish history. (CAN I USE THE WORD „STRUCTURE“ WHEN SPEAKING ABOUT A HOUSE?)

7. Almost no repairing followed until the castle became a possession of the State. (I SUGGEST NO PUNCTUATION. IS THE EXPRESSION „became a possession“ CORRECT?)

Thank you for your help.
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Try:
1. With a length of 2,413m, it was (or is?) the longest suspension bridge in Europe. 

2. Those who prefer hiking can climb up Arthur´s Seat which offers a breathtaking view of Edinburgh or Calton Hill to see the monuments situated atop. 

3. You can return via Broad Street, which used to be the centre of the medieval town and the marketplace. 

4. St Margaret´s Chapel, dating back to the 12th century, is the oldest edifice in the castle area. 

5. Walking farther, you will see many tall, narrow houses called „lands“ which were built in the 17th century. 

6. The present archetecture contains several rooms demonstrating Scott´s passion for Scottish history.

7. The castle was not repaired until it was possessed by the State.
Thank you Cbsteh.

Do you think that it is clear in the second sentence that they can climb either Arthur´s Seat or Calton Hill?

Why sometimes we use a comma before WHICH (as in 3. You can return via Broad Street, which used to be the centre of the medieval town and the marketplace.) and sometimes we don´t, as in the second sentence? (2. Those who prefer hiking can climb up Arthur´s Seat which offers a breathtaking view of Edinburgh or Calton Hill to see the monuments situated atop.)
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Hi Eff

2. Those who prefer hiking can climb up Arthur´s Seat, which offers a breathtaking view of Edinburgh, or Calton Hill to see the monuments situated atop.

3. You can return via Broad Street, which used to be the centre of the medieval town and the marketplace.

There should be commas after the words in bold.

Yes, it is clear that you can climb either Arthur's Seat or Calton Hill to see the monuments.
Thanks Yoong Liat. So it is a rule to put a comma before WHICH?
Yes, put the comma before which.
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Thanks, Barbara. So the comma should be also in the sentence nr. 5: Walking along, you will see a lot of tall, narrow houses called „lands“, which were built in the 17th century. Right?

Could you please check also these two sentences?

6. The present structure contains several rooms demonstrating Scott´s passion for Scottish history. (CAN I USE THE WORD „STRUCTURE“ WHEN SPEAKING ABOUT A HOUSE?)

7. Almost no repairing followed until the castle became a possession of the State. (I SUGGEST NO PUNCTUATION. IS THE EXPRESSION „became a possession“ CORRECT?)

Thank you so much!
Eff
EffThanks Yoong Liat. So it is a rule to put a comma before WHICH? Not correct.

2. Those who prefer hiking can climb up Arthur´s Seat, which offers a breathtaking view of Edinburgh, or Calton Hill to see the monuments situated atop.

3. You can return via Broad Street, which used to be the centre of the medieval town and the marketplace.

Put a comma after the name of a place, person or thing.

I'll give another example.

Eff, who joined the Englishforums on Dec 15 2008, is a genius.

Do you see where the commas are put?

As for sentence 7, the original sentence is fine. Why do you want to rephrase it?
I don't really see a difference between saying "put it after the person, thing, or place" and "put it before the 'which'" - what you're really doing is setting off the "which" clause with commas on either side if the sentence continues afterwards, and a comma and period if it ends the sentence.

Yes, you can call a house a structure, that's fine.

My one question about #3 - was Broad Street the center of the marketplace? Or is the return route via Broad Street and then the marketplace? If it's the latter, then you need a comma after "town," so that the "which used to be the center of hte medieveal town" is set off by commas.
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