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Yes, exactly. In this sentence, I don't parse "medium" to ... as "a small middle-size at large", therefore, no double meaning.

The double meaning is indirect. The words "small medium at large" will remind the reader (or listener) of the more ... The word "and" in the familiar phrase has to be changed to "at" to make the phrase fit the sentence.

OK, that makes sense. Needless to say, the phrase that I find familiar is "small, medium or large", as asked in soft-drinks dispensing establishments. Therefore, it would never occur to me to change the "at" to "and".
Thanks for the explanation.
"Medium" has two meanings in that sentence: 1. a size intermediate between small and large,

Yes, exactly. In this sentence, I don't parse "medium" to mean size, however I read it. It only makes sense when read as "a small fortune-teller at large". It simply doesn't make sense when interpreted as "a small middle-size at large", therefore, no double meaning.

Small, medium and large.
Small medium at large.
Decidedly punny. One of the better ones, in fact.
2. someone who serves as an intermediary between the living ... comparison in sound is between "Linoleum Blownapart" and "Napoleon Bonaparte".

Yup, that's what I wrote. To me, they don't sound similar. Again, is that legitimately "punny"?

If I heard someone say "linoleum blown apart", my very first reaction would be to think of the little general. I would not be able to refrain from thinking of Napoleon. It is, as well, decidedly punny.

There are a few I don't consider puns in that list, but these two definitely fit the subject.
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Yup, that's what I wrote. To me, they don't sound similar. Again, is that legitimately "punny"?

There is a long convoluted story, which ends with; "He was a super-calloused fragile mystic vexed with halitosis" this, meaning ... connection. These types of puns are not "belly laughers", they are intended to result in a groan, or mild chuckle.

Likewise, after a long, convoluted story:
Two obese Pattys, special Josh, Lester Cleese picking bunions on the Sesame Street bus.
Yup, that's what I wrote. To me, they don't sound similar. Again, is that legitimately "punny"?

There is a long convoluted story, which ends with; "He was a super-calloused fragile mystic vexed with halitosis" this, meaning to sound like; "Supercalafragilistic expialadocious" words

I think that's one word.
.. made up for a song in Mary Poppins, a Disney movie. Anyone knowing the movie and song would make the connection. These types of puns are not "belly laughers", they are intended to result in a groan, or mild chuckle.

Exactly. (Some call them "groaners.")
Yup, that's what I wrote. To me, they don't sound similar. Again, is that legitimately "punny"?

There is a long convoluted story, which ends with; "He was a super-calloused fragile mystic vexed with halitosis" this, meaning ... connection. These types of puns are not "belly laughers", they are intended to result in a groan, or mild chuckle.

And often the "punch" line to a Shaggy Dog story.
"Rudolph the Red knows rain, Dear".

Frank ess
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The double meaning is indirect. The words "small medium at ... changed to "at" to make the phrase fit the sentence.

OK, that makes sense. Needless to say, the phrase that I find familiar is "small, medium or large", as asked in soft-drinks dispensing establishments. Therefore, it would never occur to me to change the "at" to "and". Thanks for the explanation.

Try this one:
An inmate rapes a caretaker, and escapes from the insane asylum. Headline:
"Nut screws and bolts".

Frank ess
(snip)
* A grenade fell onto a kitchen floor in France, ... "phun" is supposed to be the guessing of that reference?

The comparison in sound is between "Linoleum Blownapart" and "Napoleon Bonaparte".(snip)

FWIW, my two-stanza limerick from 1992 playing on these words:

(Titled, "The Black Widow")
I once met a woman of wealth
Who claimed to eat mildew for health;
When no one believed what she told,
She cooked up a potful of mold
And ate fungus among us by stealth.
This same little lady of means
Used mildew to season some beans;
When offered this potent legume,
Her husband was blown from the room
And torn up into fine smithereens.
(Witnesses at the scene compared him to Napoleon,
blown apart.)

Aloha ~~~ Ozzie Maland ~~~ San Diego
Try this one: An inmate rapes a caretaker, and escapes from the insane asylum. Headline: "Nut screws and bolts".

Nononono. He raped two women in a laundry. "Nut screws washers and bolts."

Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org

Please note the changed e-mail and web addresses. The domain eepjm.newcastle.edu.au no longer exists, and I can no longer receive mail at my newcastle.edu.au addresses. The optusnet address could disappear at any time.
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And often the "punch" line to a Shaggy Dog story. "Rudolph the Red knows rain, Dear".

And another: "It's a long way to tip a Rarey."
I believe I first heard both of these on the radio show "My Word".

The class Shaggy Dog story, for me, is the one that finishes "I wouldn't send a knight out on a dog like this."

Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org

Please note the changed e-mail and web addresses. The domain eepjm.newcastle.edu.au no longer exists, and I can no longer receive mail at my newcastle.edu.au addresses. The optusnet address could disappear at any time.
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