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I found out why I didn't get that one. Apparently, ... they don't sound remotely similar that way. Case closed Emotion: wink

In AmE, the stress in "linoleum" is on the "o", and the stress in "Napoleon" is on the first "o".

This is the same in BrE, too.

Linz
Wet Yorks via Cambridge, York, London and Watford
My accent may vary
Needless to say, the phrase that I find familiar is "small, medium or large", as asked in soft-drinks dispensing establishments.

You must visit very traditional establishments. I don't think I've seen a small soft drink described as "small" for years.
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"It's a knick-knack, Patty Black, give the frog a loan."(snip)

It's a knick-knack, Patty Black, give the frog a loan; His old man's a Rolling Stone!

That's lovely but the version I learned didn't have it. Now I'm wondering whether it was part of a strain that lost the Rolling Stone line, or whether it never had it, and Rolling Stone was added later.

A Google on "give the frog a loan" plus "rolling stone" gives 553. The same phrase with a minus -stone gives 291. So it's not just me that stops at "loan."
Okay, here we go. The Google Groups archives show the "Rolling Stone" version only back 1998, with several references to it having been on the Muppets with Kermit the Frog (long before?). I can't call up the entire posts because of a technical glitch. But the version minus "stone" shows up in posts each year from 1982 to 1986. So I think the very appropriate addition of "Rolling Stone" was a professional addition from the Muppet crew.
Patty Black sure gets a lot of variation.

Best Donna Richoux
He didn't leave a tern unstoned.

I'm not familiar with the spelling "tern" in that statement.

The version that I'm familiar with is alleged to have been used about members in "working men's clubs" in Britain.

Such clubs had performances by entertainers. It was customary for the audience to react to each performance or "turn". http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=turn
turn. noun

98. Chiefly British. an individual stage performance, esp. in avaudeville theater or music hall.
Hence:
"At ABC club they leave no turn unstoned".

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
Milly, one of my co-workers, expressed her increasing frustration at how long her important print jobs were being delayed...finally, when ... some day your prints will come".. As far as I know she's still waiting for an opportunity to top me..r

This was used in a TV ad for Photomat, I think it was. (Photomat was, if memory serves, the first kiosk-style drive-up/drop-off service for photo developing and printing, located in a "hut" in parking lots of large store, malls, etc.) The point of the commercial was Photomat's rapid turnaround of your developing order in a day or two, while your local drugstore at the time might take up to a week to get the finished prints back.

Roland Hutchinson Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap (at) verizon.net is heavily filtered to remove spam. If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
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He didn't leave a tern unstoned.

I'm not familiar with the spelling "tern" in that statement.

Has to do with getting rid of a plague of maritime birds by shying (AmE) rocks at them. You can reconstruct the joke to taste from there.
The version that I'm familiar with is alleged to have been used about members in "working men's clubs" in Britain.

Never heard that one here, the theatrical "turn" being unknown or at least obsolete in Leftpondia.

Roland Hutchinson Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap (at) verizon.net is heavily filtered to remove spam. If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
There is a long convoluted story, which ends with; "He was a super-calloused fragile mystic vexed with halitosis" this, meaning to sound like; "Supercalafragilistic expialadocious" words made up for a song in Mary Poppins, a Disney movie.

ObAUE: one word, not two: supercalifragilisticexpialidocious.

Roland Hutchinson Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap (at) verizon.net is heavily filtered to remove spam. If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
(snip)

You don't mind? There once was a General Fisk Who ... stars on your shoulder!" "But I've only got one *."

(snip) General Fisk is also known to us for his fine table etiquette: There once was a General Fisk, Who relished a hot lobster bisque. Some spilt in his lap And got under his strap His exit was tastefully brisk.

That Fisk guy gets around. I know him from variants of

There was a young swordsman named Fisk
Whose fencing was skillful and brisk.
So swift was his action
The Fitzgerald contraction
Reduced his long sword to a disc.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >Oh, forget it: I can't write about
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >this anymore until I find a muchPalo Alto, CA 94304 >more sarcastic typeface.

(650)857-7572
http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
An old favorite of mine, from Bennett Cerf: "A South Korean named Syngman Rhee had a brother who was a reporter for Life Magazine

"A" South Korean? He was the country's president!

A favorite story of mine, though. I heard Cerf tell it once on the TV possibly when they had run out of contestants on What's My Line?

Roland Hutchinson Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap (at) verizon.net is heavily filtered to remove spam. If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
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