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... "Supercalafragilistic expialadocious" words made up for a song in Mary Poppins ...

No, actually, it wasn't.

As explained in "The Straight Dope":
http://www.straightdope.com/mailbag/msupercali.html

The songwriting Sherman brothers said they learned it at summer camp in the 1930s as "super-cadja-flawjalistic-espealedojus."

Best Donna Richoux
There is a long convoluted story, which ends with; "He was a super-calloused fragile mystic vexed with halitosis"

I learned it as a job description
Super California mystic (expert: halitosis)
this, meaning to sound like; "Supercalafragilistic expialadocious" words made up ... are intended to result in a groan, or mild chuckle.

"Pardon me Roy, is that the cat that chewed your new shoes." Youngsters probably won't get that one.

Allan Sherman's
He was trampling through the warehouse where the drapes of Roth are stored.
probably deserves a mention. (Glory, glory, Harry Lewis)

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >You gotta know when to code,
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 > Know when to log out,Palo Alto, CA 94304 >Know when to single step,
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
I learned it as a job description Super California mystic (expert: halitosis)

"Pardon me Roy, is that the cat that chewed your new shoes." Youngsters probably won't get that one.

Allan Sherman's He was trampling through the warehouse where the drapes of Roth are stored. probably deserves a mention. (Glory, glory, Harry Lewis)

In the Good Old Days of aue we wrote our own versions. We were especially fond of that rose-red city...
My post from July 2003 refers:
http://tinyurl.com/2o5jqg

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
(snip) (snip) General Fisk is also known to us for ... got under his strap His exit was tastefully brisk.

That Fisk guy gets around. I know him from variants of There was a young swordsman named Fisk Whose fencing was skillful and brisk. So swift was his action The Fitzgerald contraction Reduced his long sword to a disc.

Or an un-bowdlerized version
There once was a physicist, Fisk,
Whose screwing was terribly brisk.
So fast was his action,
The Fitzgerald contraction
Would shorten his rod to a disk.

Jerry Friedman
One I actually got to use in real life: Back in the days when we had a "printer room", anyone ... some day your prints will come".. As far as I know she's still waiting for an opportunity to top me..r

There was a time at Lockheed when blueprints had to be requested by submission of a little request slip. Sooner or later they would arrive, delivered to your mail stop. "Someday my prints will come" was an often used phrase. By the way, I have the song, as played by Brubeck, somewhere in my music collection.
I really missed the times when we were allowed to go into the blueprint library stacks and help ourselves. I had a full set of all pertinent missile drawings in my desk, under lock and key, of course.
Skitt
Jes' fine!
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
He didn't leave a tern unstoned.

I'm not familiar with the spelling "tern" in that statement.

Ornithologist, studying panic flight responses of Arctic terns..
(snip)

It's a knick-knack, Patty Black, give the frog a loan; His old man's a Rolling Stone!

That's lovely but the version I learned didn't have it. Now I'm wondering whether it was part of a strain ... gives 553. The same phrase with a minus -stone gives 291. So it's not just me that stops at "loan."

The version I heard was "give the wog a loan", which phrase only returns 3 hits in Google.
Milly, one of my co-workers, expressed her increasing frustration at how long her important print jobs were being delayed...finally, when ... some day your prints will come".. As far as I know she's still waiting for an opportunity to top me.

Is this the traditional English verb, as heard sometimes in the form "he topped himself"?

Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org

Please note the changed e-mail and web addresses. The domain eepjm.newcastle.edu.au no longer exists, and I can no longer receive mail at my newcastle.edu.au addresses. The optusnet address could disappear at any time.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Hmm, those fit the limerick form only partially. Lines three and four of each stanza are much too long.

There once was a bard from Japan
Whose limericks never would scan.
When told it was so,
He replied, "Yes, I know,
But I always try to fit as many words into the last line as I possibly can."

Odysseus
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