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I am watching a YouTube video about Participle Clauses with Adverbial Meaning by Smrt English.

C. When he was pushed forward, the door hit him in the face.

D. Pushed forward, the door hit me in the face.

The teacher said both sentences are good. He says to to convert C to D, you delete "when, was and the subject he".

Does "D" sound grammatically correct and natural?

I thought it's an example of dangling modifier.

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D. Pushed forward, the door hit me in the face. This means the door was pushed forward and it hit me in the face.

Clive

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JigneshbharatiThe teacher said both sentences are good. He says to to convert C to D, you delete "when, was and the subject he".

They are both good sentences, but the second is not a conversion of the first. The meanings are different.

In C "he" was pushed; in C "the door" was pushed.

A conversion of C to D requires "he" as the subject of the main clause in D because "he" was pushed in C:

Pushed forward, he was hit in the face by the door.

An admittedly horrible sentence, but that's what you need if you start with "pushed forward" and you're aiming for the same meaning as C.

CJ

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Comments  
JigneshbharatiI thought it's an example of dangling modifier.

It is. I wonder what his native language is.

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