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While reading an article in the on-line newspaper, I found a peculiar use of the verb 'put'.

e.g. “The study put to rest two incorrect arguments that
persisted because of an absence of evidence,”

Having searched the web for getting at the use of 'put' in the context above just left me with nothing because the results in the web showed 'put to' as used in the transitive phrasal verb; put sth to sb, put someone to trouble/bother/inconvenience and so on.
What way of using the verb 'put' does make it possible for 'put' to be used there?
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The writer botched the idiom. He meant "The study laid to rest two incorrect arguments that persisted because of an absence of evidence." He confused it with "put an end to". Here is a link to the Cambridge Advance Learner's Dictionary entry: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/american-english/lay-something-to-rest
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Thank you so much,
Then the direct object must be postponed for its heaviness.
cho7712Thank you so much,Then the direct object must be postponed for its heaviness.
Exactly, though we'd say "length" instead of "heaviness".
Thank you for the exact term, I actually had no clear idea about what I have to term that grammatical feature.
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