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The expression, "put on hood" is a used one? And what does it mean?

In the drama CSI, I think I heard the expression, "I will put you on hood"

The situation was after the crime was solved and between the detectives.
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Hi,
I think you misheard, but I don't know what was actually said. Can you supply any more information at all?
Clive
Thanks. The situation was after the crime was solved.

A male detective to female detective ; "Are you hungry?"

Female detective: "Yes"

Male: "Let's go to eat. I will put you on hood"

Female: "No, I will put you on hood"

As I am not a native speaker, I am not sure I heard exactly that way. Can you lift up the clouds?
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I would guess that 'hood' is actually 'food', but I can't make an idiomatic phrase out of the 'put you on' part.
Maybe, "hook you on food"?

Is it used expression?

Nope. The two speakers are making an offer and a counter-offer, as if they were each offering to pay for the meal (or conning the other into paying for it). But I cannot think of a phrase that makes sense and sounds like 'put -- on food'. To 'put-- on a diet' is a stock phase, but does not work here, either. I hope another member has a better imagination than I.
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Hi,
A male detective to female detective ; "Are you hungry?"
Female detective: "Yes"
Male: "Let's go to eat. I will put you on hood"
Female: "No, I will put you on hood"

Hi,
That's tough to guess.

One thought: 'hood is afro-american slang for neighbourhood. Can we do something based on that?

Another thought: If a NS says 'let's go to eat', I think a likely context in which they would go on to mention food is to discuss what kind of food.
eg "Let's go to eat. I will hook you on Korean food" .
What has the same sound and stress as what the questioner heard?

Clive
'I'll put you on hold.'
'No, I'll put you on hold.'

To me, it's the reciprocity of the exchange that limits the options severely.
Hi,
How about
'I'll put you on good.'
'No, I'll put you on good.'
in the 'tease you' sense of 'put you on'?

Perhaps they are the 'bantering buddies' type of cops.
Clive
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