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I put up at the pavement last night, as we didn't have money to avail a room.

Yesterday I saw him on TV interview, and he came over as a quite gossipmonger. I think really it used to be difficult for his relatives to put him up for ever.

Hi Clieee, you can come over here. I will put you up for the days you stay here.

I remember he killed my father 10 years ago. From then onwards, my mind haunts with how to get even with him. So, I put him up to the murder and he deserves 10 years imprisonment for the same.

Are these sentences correct?
Comments  
I put up at the pavement last night, as we didn't have money to avail a room. No - an incorrect use of 'put up'. To 'put up' means to provide accomodation for. You put other people up, people don't put themselves up. Also, the pavement doesn't count! 'to avail' is also incorrect. 'to avail ourselves' would be ok but peculiarly formal.

Yesterday I saw him on TV interview, and he came over as quite a gossipmonger. I think really it used to be difficult for his relatives to put him up for ever. Note the inversion of word order. I'm not sure what you want to say in your second sentence. Are the relatives 'putting him up' by providing accomodation for him, or putting up with (tolerating) his behaviour?

Hi Clieee, you can come over here. I will put you up. for the days you stay here.

I remember he killed my father 10 years ago. From then onwards, my mind is haunted with how to get even with him. So, I put him up to the murder and he deserves 10 years imprisonment for the same. Your final sentence doesn't make much sense. How are you using 'put him up'?
I put up at the pavement last night, as we didn't have money to avail a room. No - an incorrect use of 'put up'. To 'put up' means to provide accomodation for. You put other people up, people don't put themselves up. Also, the pavement doesn't count! 'to avail' is also incorrect. 'to avail ourselves' would be ok but peculiarly formal.

Yesterday I saw him on TV interview, and he came over as quite a gossipmonger. I think really it used to be difficult for his relatives to put him up for ever. Note the inversion of word order. I'm not sure what you want to say in your second sentence. Are the relatives 'putting him up' by providing accomodation for him, or putting up with (tolerating) his behaviour?

Hi Clieee, you can come over here. I will put you up. for the days you stay here.

I remember he killed my father 10 years ago. From then onwards, my mind is haunted with how to get even with him. So, I put him up to the murder and he deserves 10 years imprisonment for the same. Your final sentence doesn't make much sense. How are you using 'put him up'?
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Nona The BritYesterday I saw him on TV interview, and he came over as quite a gossipmonger. I think really it used to be difficult for his relatives to put him up for ever. Note the inversion of word order. I'm not sure what you want to say in your second sentence. Are the relatives 'putting him up' by providing accomodation for him, or putting up with (tolerating) his behaviour?

I mean by that "it is difficult for his relatives to tolerate his behaviour"
I remember he killed my father 10 years ago. From then onwards, my mind is haunted with how to get even with him. So, I put him up to the charge of murder and he deserves 10 years imprisonment for the same. Your final sentence doesn't make much sense. How are you using 'put him up'?
I applied this meaning of the dictionary :

put sb up to sth phrasal verb
to encourage someone to do something, usually something wrong:
I think he was put up to it by his friends.

Ok.

for the tolerate behaviour meaning, you have to keep to the phrase 'put up with', with all three words in that order. His relatives wouldn't put up with his behaviour. She put up with his snoring for years. So for your sentence ...his relatives to put up with him ...

to encourage someone to do something, usually something wrong:
I think he was put up to it by his friends.

You are not really applying this definition in your sentence. Are you telling/encouraging the man to go and do something? No.
Thank you friends.
You are not really applying this definition in your sentence. Are you telling/encouraging the man to go and do something? No.
I encouraged him to do the murder.
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That isn't clear from your sentence. It sounded more as though you were falsly accusing him of a murder to get your own back, due to the use of 'put him up to the charge of murder'. The charge is when the police charge someone, not something the criminal does. Can you see why this doesn't work?

You put him up to committing a murder.
Thank you.
You put him up to committing a murder.
I got good version "I put him up to committing a murder"; but can I say "I put him up the murder" to mean the same.
I put him up to the murder, yes.
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