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Einstein wrote this riddle last century and said that 98% of the world’s population would not be able to solve it. • There are 5 houses that are each a different colour. • There is a person of a different nationality in each house. • The 5 owners drink a certain drink. They each smoke a certain brand of cigarettes and also have a certain pet. No owner has the same pet, smokes the same brand of cigarettes nor drinks the same drink. • The question is. “Who has the fish?” CLUES 1. The British man lives in the red house. 2. The Swedish man has a dog for a pet. 3. The Danish man drinks tea. 4. The green house is to the left of the white house. 5. The owner of the green house drinks coffee. 6. The person that smokes Pall Mall has a bird. 7. The owner of the yellow house smokes Dunhill. 8. The person that lives in the middle house drinks milk. 9. The Norwegian lives in the first house. 10. The person that smokes Blend, lives next to the one that has a cat. 11. The person that has a horse lives next to the one that smokes Dunhill. 12. The one that smokes Bluemaster drinks beer. 13. The German smokes Prince. 14. The Norwegian lives next to a blue house. 15. The person that smokes Blend, has a neighbour that drinks water. GOOD LUCK!!! ...
 
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Once Shiro had 5 pounds of fat on him, he must lose the fat. he gains fat at a rate of two pounds per month in the month of Slacking, the month of Flirting, and the month of AFKing. he gains fat at a rate of 1.2 pounds per month in the month of walking, the month of sitting, and the month of killing players. he gains fat at a rate of 0.6 pounds per month in the month of Relaxing, the month of talking, and the month of Hiding. And he gains fat at a rate of 1.5 pounds per month in the month of collecting, the month of gaining, and the month of Storing. Assuming he start from beginning, and he can lose weight when he has 5 pounds of fat on him how many days will it take for Norbert to gain 100 pounds of fat?
By Anonymous  
 
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when counting from seven, to the dark from the light, 6 moves to the mathematical middle. 4 rained doom from heaven, and 1 inspired spite, what list inspired this riddle?
 
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I have many babies in me that raise my temperature. Who am I?
By Anonymous  
 
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if 2+3=8,3+7=27,4+5=32,5+8=60,6+7=72 then 7+8=???
 
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The most common lies in the English Language: It wasn't me. I'm fine. Gee, you haven’t changed a bit. The cheque is in the mail. I never got the message. We service what we sell. She is only a friend. Your baby looks so beautiful. That looks so good on you. One size fits all. I'll start my diet on Monday. Thank you, dinner was so delicious. I need 5 minutes of your time. I never said that. Give me your number and the doctor will call you right back. Money cheerfully refunded. This offer limited to the first 100 people who call in. Leave your CV and we’ll keep it on file. This hurts me more than it hurts you. Your table will be ready in a few minutes. Open wide, it won’t hurt a bit. Let’s have lunch sometime. It’s not the money, it’s the principle. I wasn’t feeling well. I didn’t want to hurt your feelings. I was just kidding. I was only trying to help. If you can think of any more, feel free to add them here.
 
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what isn't edible but can be found in any room. its fresh and clean and a delight to one of your senses. it is a solid object and you wouldn't wear out.
 
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I am the first on earth second in heaven i apears two times in aw week you can only see me onece a year although I am in the middle of the sea.
 
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a friend asked this: a perfect world is one where there are: cells but no skin teeth but no mouths feet but no toes pools but no land ??
 
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Hi guys, I feel like having some riddle fun so I found some riddles for ya. Do you have an answer?? There are four brothers in this world that were all born together: The first he runs and never wearies, The second eats and is never full. The third he drinks and is ever thirsty, And the fourth sings a song that is never good. Who are they?
 
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LAST, NOT FIRST, THE NAME WHO PENNED:
 
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I have found in my dictionary two ways on how to write that something took place on July: "In late July 1914, he and Violet spent a few days with friends near Berwick-upon-Tweed" and "I expect you to report for work on July the twenty-eight." I wonder why in the first sentence it is written "in July". Does it matter that there is the word "late" ? Is it correct or maybe it is better to write "on July" as in the second sentence? How shoul I say "on July" or "in July"?
 
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Thirty white horses on a red hill, First they champ, Then they stamp, Then they stand still.
 
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I come in all sizes, I come in many different colors. I may be more than one color at a time too. I can hold things, I can make things look nice. People respect me for what I may mean too. What am I? Help ;o
 
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I'm a cricket cracking my brain What am I?
 
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45) PNEUMONO­ULTRA­MICRO­SCOPIC­SILICO­VOLCANO­CONIOSIS (also spelled PNEUMONO­ULTRA­MICRO­SCOPIC­SILICO­VOLCANO­KONIOSIS) = a lung disease caused by breathing in particles of siliceous volcanic dust. This is the longest word in any English dictionary. However, it was coined by Everett Smith, the President of The National Puzzlers' League, in 1935 purely for the purpose of inventing a new "longest word". The Oxford English Dictionary described the word as factitious. Nevertheless it also appears in the Webster's, Random House, and Chambers dictionaries. (37) HEPATICO­CHOLANGIO­CHOLECYST­ENTERO­STOMIES = a surgical creation of a connection between the gall bladder and a hepatic duct and between the intestine and the gall bladder. This is the longest word in Gould's Medical Dictionary. (34) SUPER­CALI­FRAGI­LISTIC­EXPI­ALI­DOCIOUS = song title from the Walt Disney movie Mary Poppins. It is in the Oxford English Dictionary. "But then one day I learned a word That saved me achin' nose, The biggest word you ever 'eard, And this is 'ow it goes: Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious!" (30) HIPPOPOTO­MONSTRO­SESQUIPED­AL­IAN = pertaining to a very long word. From Mrs. Byrne's Dictionary of Unusual, Obscure and Preposterous Words. (29) FLOCCI­NAUCINI­HILIPIL­IFICATION = an estimation of something as worthless. This is the longest word in the first edition of the Oxford English Dictionary. Interestingly the most common letter in English, E, does not appear in this word at all, whilst I occurs a total of nine times. The word dates back to 1741. The 1992 Guinness Book of World Records calls flocci­nauci­nihili­pilification the longest real word in the Oxford English Dictionary, and refers to pneumono­ultra­micro­scopic­silico­volcano­koniosis as the longest made-up one. (28) ANTI­DIS­ESTABLISH­MENT­ARIAN­ISM = the belief which opposes removing the tie between church and state. Probably the most popular of the "longest words" in recent decades. (27) HONORI­FICABILI­TUDINI­TATIBUS = honorableness. The word first appeared in English in 1599, and in 1721 was listed by Bailey's Dictionary as the longest word in English. It was used by Shakespeare in Love's Labor's Lost (Costard; Act V, Scene I): "O, they have lived long on the alms-basket of words. I marvel thy master hath not eaten thee for a word; for thou art not so long by the head as honorificabilitudinitatibus: thou art easier swallowed than a flap-dragon." Shakespeare does not use any other words over 17 letters in length. (27) ELECTRO­ENCEPHALO­GRAPHICALLY The longest unhyphenated word in Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (10th Ed.), joint with ethylene­diamine­tetraacetate (see below). (27) ANTI­TRANSUB­STAN­TIA­TION­ALIST = one who doubts that consecrated bread and wine actually change into the body and blood of Christ. (21) DIS­PRO­PORTION­ABLE­NESS and (21) IN­COM­PREHEN­SIB­ILITIES These are described by the 1992 Guinness Book of World Records as the longest words in common usage. Some say SMILES is the longest word because there is a MILE between the first and last letters! -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Chemical Terms Two chemical terms (3,641 and 1,913 letters long) have appeared in the Guinness Book of World Records. They were withdrawn because they have never been used by chemists, and there is no theoretical limit to the length of possible legitimate chemical terms. A DNA molecule could have a name of over 1,000,000,000 letters if it was written out in full. (1,185) ACETYL­SERYL­TYROSYL­SERYL­ISO­LEUCYL­THREONYL­SERYL­PROLYL­SERYL­GLUTAMINYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­VALYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­LEUCYL­SERYL­SERYL­VALYL­TRYPTOPHYL­ALANYL­ASPARTYL­PROLYL­ISOLEUCYL­GLUTAMYL­LEUCYL­LEUCYL­ASPARAGINYL­VALYL­CYSTEINYL­THREONYL­SERYL­SERYL­LEUCYL­GLYCYL­ASPARAGINYL­GLUTAMINYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­GLUTAMINYL­THREONYL­GLUTAMINYL­GLUTAMINYL­ALANYL­ARGINYL­THREONYL­THREONYL­GLUTAMINYL­VALYL­GLUTAMINYL­GLUTAMINYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­SERYL­GLUTAMINYL­VALYL­TRYPTOPHYL­LYSYL­PROLYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­PROLYL­GLUTAMINYL­SERYL­THREONYL­VALYL­ARGINYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­PROLYL­GLYCYL­ASPARTYL­VALYL­TYROSYL­LYSYL­VALYL­TYROSYL­ARGINYL­TYROSYL­ASPARAGINYL­ALANYL­VALYL­LEUCYL­ASPARTYL­PROLYL­LEUCYL­ISOLEUCYL­THREONYL­ALANYL­LEUCYL­LEUCYL­GLYCYL­THREONYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­ASPARTYL­THREONYL­ARGINYL­ASPARAGINYL­ARGINYL­ISOLEUCYL­ISOLEUCYL­GLUTAMYL­VALYL­GLUTAMYL­ASPARAGINYL­GLUTAMINYL­GLUTAMINYL­SERYL­PROLYL­THREONYL­THREONYL­ALANYL­GLUTAMYL­THREONYL­LEUCYL­ASPARTYL­ALANYL­THREONYL­ARGINYL­ARGINYL­VALYL­ASPARTYL­ASPARTYL­ALANYL­THREONYL­VALYL­ALANYL­ISOLEUCYL­ARGINYL­SERYL­ALANYL­ASPARAGINYL­ISOLEUCYL­ASPARAGINYL­LEUCYL­VALYL­ASPARAGINYL­GLUTAMYL­LEUCYL­VALYL­ARGINYL­GLYCYL­THREONYL­GLYCYL­LEUCYL­TYROSYL­ASPARAGINYL­GLUTAMINYL­ASPARAGINYL­THREONYL­PHENYL­ALANYL­GLUTAMYL­SERYL­METHIONYL­SERYL­GLYCYL­LEUCYL­VALYL­TRYPTOPHYL­THREONYL­SERYL­ALANYL­PROLYL­ALANYL­SERINE = Tobacco Mosaic Virus, Dahlemense Strain. This word has appeared in the American Chemical Society's Chemical Abstracts and is thus considered by some to be the longest real word. (39) TETRA­METHYL­DIAMINO­BENZHYDRYL­PHOSPHINOUS = a type of acid. This is the longest chemical term in the Oxford English Dictionary (2nd Ed.). It does not have its own entry but appears under a citation for another word. (37) FORMALDEHYDE­TETRA­METHYL­AMIDO­FLUORIMUM Chemical term in the Oxford English Dictionary (2nd Ed.). (37) DIMETHYL­AMIDO­PHENYL­DIMETHYL­PYRAZOLONE Chemical term in the Oxford English Dictionary (2nd Ed.). (31) DICHLORO­DIPHENYL­TRICHLORO­ETHANE = a pesticide used to kill lice; abbrv. DDT. It is the longest word in the Macquarie Dictionary and is also in the Oxford English Dictionary (2nd Ed.). (29) TRINITRO­PHENYL­METHYL­NITRAMINE = a type of explosive. This is the longest chemical term in Webster's Dictionary (3rd Ed.). (27) ETHYLENE­DIAMINE­TETRA­ACETATE The longest unhyphenated word in Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (10th Ed.), joint with electroencephalographically (see above). (26) ETHYLENE­DIAMINE­TETRA­ACETIC = a type of acid; abbrv. EDTA. This word appears in Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (10th Ed.). -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Place Names There are many long place names around the world. Here are a few of the largest. (85) TAUMATA­WHAKA­TANGI­HANGA­KOAUAU­O­TAMATEA­TURIPUKAKA­PIKI­MAUNGA­HORO­NUKU­POKAI­WHENUA­KITANA­TAHU A hill in New Zealand. This Maori name was in general use, but is now generally abbreviated to Taumata. The name means: the summit of the hill, where Tamatea, who is known as the land eater, slid down, climbed up and swallowed mountains, played on his nose flute to his loved one. (66) GORSA­FAWDDACH­AIDRAIGODAN­HEDDO­GLEDDOLON­PENRHYN­AREUR­DRAETH­CEREDIGION A town in Wales. The name means: the Mawddach station and its dragon teeth at the Northern Penrhyn Road on the golden beach of Cardigan bay. (58) LLAN­FAIR­PWLL­GWYN­GYLL­GOGERY­CHWYRN­DROBWLL­LLANTY­SILIO­GOGO­GOCH A town in North Wales. The name roughly translates as: St. Mary's Church in the hollow of the white hazel near to the rapid whirlpool of Llantysilio of the red cave. It is listed in the Guinness Book of World Records. (41) CHAR­GOGAGOG­MAN­CHAR­GOGAGOG­CHAR­BUNA­GUNGAMOG Another name for Lake Webster in Massachusetts. Probably the longest name in the United States. Alternative spellings are: (44) CHAR­GOGGAGOGG­MAN­CHAUG­GAGOGG­CHAU­BUNA­GUNGAMOGG, (45) CHAR­GOGGAGOGG­MAN­CHAUG­GAGOGG­CHAU­BUNA­GUNGAMAUGG, (44) CHAR­GOGGAGOGG­MAN­CHAUG­GAGOGG­CHA­BUNA­GUNGAMAUGG. (23) NUNATH­LOOGAGA­MIUT­BINGOI The Eskimo name for some dunes in Alaska, according to The Book of Names by J. N. Hook.
 
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Three ants were walking in a straight line (one behind the other). The first ant said "There are two ants behind me". The second ant said "There is one ant in front of me and one ant behind me". The third ant said "There are two ants in front of me and two ants behind me". Why did the third ant say that?
 
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U saw a shirt for 97.00, and since you don't have enough cash, you borrowed 50.00 from your mother and 50.00 from your father which will give you 100.11. Since the shirt is 97.00 that will give you 3.00 change which you give 1.00 to your mother and 1.00 to your father and keep the other 1.00 to yourself. You now owe your mother and father both 49.00 which means 49.00 + 49.00 = 98.00 plus the 1.00 you kept for yourself gives you a total of 99.00. Where's the missing 1.00?
 
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I have four legs but never walk, I may be covered with flowers but have no soil, I hold food 3 times a day But never eat a meal. What am I?
 
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Please help with this riddle my brother gave me. Its driving me crazy please There is a lot of graves with a name on it (not the important part I think. Then their birth date and dead date is on the stone aswell which i guess is the important part as my hint is "Try think of the English zodiac signs" Thank you a lot and sorry for wasting your time: The following is a riddle. Read through multiple times and think very carefully. I have one thing to say. I am the killer. I will make it clear as day it was truly a thriller. I ram-med my blade through many but it wasnt just any. Only those with a lions pride were targets that i eyed. And though at times my hand were crabby. I'd go after people that lived in an Abbey. Others fought back with the strength of an ox. Others would go and fight back with rocks. Alas I'd never harm a maiden. To thier homes i take no blade in. Even i need balance in my life, and occasional break from causing strife. Regardless I have my pincers strike, King or peasant they all are alike. if no pincers then i use a quiver with precesion an arrow i would deliver. While fleeing id graze from town to town. If Things got excited id try and stay Down. Id hide in the Mountains id hide in the hills. Blending in with goat herders took keen skills. A few times i even had to swim. Nearly drowning in storms, those times were grim. Id wake on an Island all alone and Cold. Living of fish my life uncontrolled. Now you know my entire story. Ive killed and stolen my way to glory. You clearly know that im the bad guy, but I've just one question for you, WHO am I?
 
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Like a box like a cage it traps its keeper.
 
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I need help..... It grows in the ground, seek the key to open yourself and help you see and when you do you'll be set free , be it sword or key....... It's called a andehonia mystery shadow..... But what is it
 
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What is the most rhymable word in the English language?
 
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Lazy,&quick tv-show jumped in a bx.(30 letters)(bx. is an approved abbreviation of box).
 
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It's a riddle from a video game named Hunted The Demon's Forge. Please, explain the second row: Here lies the second of three brothers Who guard a prize with one another. To win the key within this tomb Bring here the life that thrives in gloom.
 
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