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Hello,

Would you please tell me if we could say both 'get off' or 'get down' when we are talking about enclosed vehicles?
For eg, could we say either 'get off' or 'get down' in these examples?

- Don't get off / get down the moving bus.
- Where do you want to get off / get down the bus?
- The next stop is XYZ, are you going to get off / get down (the bus) over there?

Also, is it essential for us to say get off the bus or the car, for example? Can't we just say 'Where do you want to get off?' or 'Where do you want to get down?'

I hear 'boarding' and 'deboarding' when I'm traveling in a Metro or a train. For eg, 'Do not push other passengers while boarding and deboaring the train'. But could we use these terms ('boarding' and 'deboarding') with other means of transport such as 'bus', 'car', 'plane' etc. as well?

Thank you all.
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"get off the bus/train/plane/etc." is fine. Just "get off" (without naming a vehicle) is fine when it is clear what you are referring to.

"get down the bus/etc." is wrong (in the relevant sense). It is not possible to "get down" something (in the relevant sense). You can "get down from" something. It is possible to use this with buses etc., but more typically you would "get down from" a tree, say, or a roof, or some other elevated position. "get down" can also be used by itself when the object is clear from context: "What are you doing up there? Get down!".

"boarding" is for larger passenger vehicles (buses, trains, planes, ships, etc.). It wouldn't be used for a car. The word "deboarding" is apparently used by some people, but it does not sound like a proper English word to me. It sounds like made-up jargon or officialese.
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With cars -
You get in(into) a car.
You get out of a car.

Clive
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OK, dear GPY and Clive. And thanks a lot for your informative replies! Emotion: smile

But I wonder why it is that we can say 'get on/onto the bus, train, ship, or plane etc', but not 'get on the car'.

@Clive, When we want to ask somebody to get inside a car, can't we say 'get on/onto the car', please?
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@Clive, When we want to ask somebody to get inside a car, can't we say 'get on/onto the car', please? No. If you get on a car, it sounds like you are eg sitting on the roof

IF I SAY TO SOMEONE ON METRO THAT HE WANTS TO DEBOARD ON NEXT STATION OR NOT?? THEN IT IS CORRECT OR NOT.

mango grape, please rewrite that with Caps Lock off. It looks like you are shouting at us.

Use capital letters only where they belong.

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Clive, When we want to ask somebody to get inside a car, can't we say 'get on/onto the car', please? No. If you get on a car, it sounds like you are eg sitting on the roof

English is a wonderful language and prepositions make it even better. It is easy to remember this way, so, when you talk about enclosed spaces, you use IN, like in the room, In pocket, In car, in bus etc. But when you talk about surfaces, you use ON, like On the sofa, On the wall, On the table or On desk and so on.