Hi
which of the following is the correct term/spelling for a (home-made) christmas card to be send to the US of A, and, would there be any difference if this card would go to the U.K. or Australia ?

Seasons Greetings
seasons greetings
Season greetings
Seasons greeting
Thank you
Nicholas Adams
Hi which of the following is the correct term/spelling for a (home-made) christmas card to be send to the US ... this card would go to the U.K. or Australia ? Seasons Greetings seasons greetings Season greetings Seasons greeting Thank you

The correct phrase is 'Have a good Yule'.
Hi which of the following is the correct term/spelling for a (home-made) christmas card to be send to the US ... difference if this card would go to the U.K. or Australia ? Seasons Greetings seasons greetings Season greetings Seasons greeting

The greetings "belong" to the season, so it's a possessive rather than a plural: "Season's Greetings".
Both are capitalised, as with other salutations like "Happy Birthday".

Cheers, Harvey
CanEng and BrEng, indiscriminately mixed
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HVS (Email Removed) schrieb:
On 11 Dec 2009, Nicholas Adams wrote

Hi which of the following is the correct term/spelling for ... Australia ? Seasons Greetings seasons greetings Season greetings Seasons greeting

The greetings "belong" to the season, so it's a possessive rather than a plural: "Season's Greetings". Both are capitalised, as with other salutations like "Happy Birthday".

Thank you all so much and:
Merry Christmas & a healthy, happy and prosperous new year

Nicholas Adams
Hi,
Speaking as an American, I would send Season's Greetings. Note that technically there should be an apostrophe before the 's' because it is a possessive form--greetings of the season. While this is the correct way to spell it, most people [and commercial card companies] omit the 's and few people, other than grammarian/editors like me would even notice.

Language in the UK seems to be a bit more formal than here, so maybe they do use the 's. Aussies are probably more like Americans and omit it.

TrysB
Hi which of the following is the correct term/spelling for a (home-made) christmas card to be send to the US of A, and, would there be any difference if this card would go to the U.K. or Australia ?

You phrase this in the singular, but you might be making more than one.
If you are making one or more cards at home, one at a time, one might personalize the card according to the holidays that the intended recipient celebrates, if one knows.
If you're making one at home and planning to reproduce it and send the same card to everyone, then: When used as an exclamation or slogan in a greeting card, it's typical to capitalize both words, Season's Greetings. When used in a sentence, such as "I wish you my warmest season's greetings", I don't think I see a basis to capitalize either.

I don't know what cults exist in Britain that Roger refers to, nor whether they have outrage or if that is an exaggeration. But to get a card urging one to enjoy a holiday which he does not celebrate to begin with seem to imply a) the card was meant to go to someone else. b) the sender is trying to indoctrinate the recipient (and people tend to dislike that), or c) the sender paid no attention to what the card actually said, or pays no attention to something fairly important about the recipient. So I would call a lack of appreciation of a inapplicable card understandable and not synthetic.
Seasons Greetings seasons greetings Season greetings Seasons greeting Thank you Nicholas Adams

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Hi which of the following is the correct term/spelling for ... Seasons Greetings seasons greetings Season greetings Seasons greeting Thank you

The correct phrase is 'Have a good Yule'.

Have a cool Yule and a frantic First.

** DAVE HATUNEN (Email Removed) ** * Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow * * My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
The correct phrase is 'Have a good Yule'.

Have a cool Yule and a frantic First.

One of my best friends used to say "Have a cool Yule, a frantic First, and an empty fifth."
Bill in Kentucky