"I will deliver it to you once I received it." I would like to ask whether I'm correct to use "received" here instead of "receive".

Thanks
Note: Please correct me if you find any mistakes in my sentences.
conjecture (Email Removed) wrote on 10 Feb 2004:
"I will deliver it to you once I received it." I would like to ask whether I'm correct to use "received" here instead of "receive".

No, "received" is not correct here. It has to be "receive". You might be able to use "have received", though, but that is not idiomatic in this context in my dialect.
I would change in to "I will {bring it/send it/have it delivered} to you when I receive it".

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
"I will deliver it to you once I received it." I would like to ask whether I'm correct to use "received" here instead of "receive".

If you say it, everybody will think you're saying "I've received it" and just slurring the /v/ more than usually. So you can get away with it aloud.
But don't write it, because it should be present tense "I receive it" or perfect "I've received it".
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"I will deliver it to you once I received it." I would like to ask whether I'm correct to use "received" here instead of "receive".

No, "received" is not correct here. It has to be "receive". You might be able to use "have received", though, but that is not idiomatic in this context in my dialect.

"I will deliver it when I have received it" sounds perfectly OK to me. It's informal, and would more likely be "I'll deliver it when I've received it."

John Varela
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Hi all,
so from the answers here it seems that the usage of "once" in this context isn't correct (or usual) at all. Is there a general rule for when to use "when" instead of "once"?
Cheers,
Andre, Germany
} so from the answers here it seems that the usage of } "once" in this context isn't correct (or usual) at all. } Is there a general rule for when to use "when" instead } of "once"?
"Once" wasn't the problem. "Received" was the problem. "When" is merely a little more ordinary. Check the answers again.

R. J. Valentine
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Hi all, so from the answers here it seems that the usage of "once" in this context isn't correct (or usual) at all. Is there a general rule for when to use "when" instead of "once"?

There is nothing wrong with 'once' in your sentence. I don't know where you got that impression.
For what it's worth, I think I would write either 'when I receive it' or 'once I have received it'. I couldn't explain why, but those sound marginally better than the other way around.

Regards
John
Hi all, so from the answers here it seems that the usage of "once" in this context isn't correct (or usual) at all. Is there a general rule for when to use "when" instead of "once"?

("I will deliver it to you once I receive it" - NB necessary correction, as others have observed, of "received" to "receive", or "have received")

"When" is the general-purpose, neutral word for your sentence.

"Once" carries just a hint of impatience or exasperation. Using "once", the sentence means "Just stop pestering me with letters about this consignment. Yes, of course I will deliver it as soon as it arrives, but I can't work miracles". Or perhaps, depending on the real-life context, the exasperation would be understood as being with the manufacturers, not the customer. Either way, "once" is coloured, not neutral. So "when" and "once" are not precisely interchangeable.
Alan Jones