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Hello,

Still having issues with countable and unountable nouns...

Macmillina dictionary says "quality of life" is uncountable, but

I find some instances in Atlantics editorials that use

For A better quality of life, we should ...

They use A for this...

Is there something I am not understanding?
Thank you
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Comments  
Yes; you seem to think that uncountable nouns never take an article.

They often do.

Rover
This is a huge problem for me.

I just don't understand why these dictionaries say that no "a" article should be used for uncountable nouns...

Sigh...
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They mean, you can't say 'a music', 'a happiness', 'a/an advice'

But look at carefully at the sentence:
'...offers a better quality of life...'

When we use an adjective, qualifying the noun, we do use articles.
TerryxpressThey mean, you can't say 'a music', 'a happiness', 'a/an advice'But look at carefully at the sentence:'...offers a better quality of life...'When we use an adjective, qualifying the noun, we do use articles.
Yes, but not always and that's the hard part.

We all should strive for a better quality of life. (quality of life is modified by "better")

It was a grief he had not felt before. ("grief" is modified by the phrase "he had not felt before")

What a pity! ("pity" is uncountable and yet takes an a)

but

We've made good progress.

She speaks excellent English.

They stood in complete silence.

What appalling weather!
i agree.
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Ok, Thanks guys for throughly confusing me... Emotion: sad
"It was a grief he had not felt before" seems like a shortened form of "It was A TYPE (or KIND) OF grief [THAT] he had not felt before"; in that case, the A makes sense... I think!
"What a pity!" is perhaps a shortened form of "What a GREAT pity!". Does that make a difference? Also, PITY seems to be a special kind of noun, in that "That's A PITY" is equivalent to "That's UNFORTUNATE", and UNFORTUNATE is an adjective. I guess you could at least say that PITY is not a "concrete" noun, in the sense that CAT is "concrete".

As for "We should all strive for A better quality of life", I don't know... It's definitely correct; ".. strive FOR BETTER quality of life" is not idiomatic at all.
I think a REAL expert is needed :-/
Hi,

I don't claim to be an expert, but here is how I see it.

By adding the adjective, the writer is showing that he is thinking there are different kinds of qualities of life.
eg a better quality of life
eg a worse quality of life
eg a normal quality of life
eg a surprising quality of life.

Clive
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