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qualm
synonyms QUALM, SCRUPLE, COMPUNCTION, DEMUR mean a misgiving about what one is doing or going to do. QUALM implies an uneasy fear that one is not following one's conscience or better judgment <no qualms about plagiarizing>.
[M-W's Col. Dic.]

What is an uneasy fear? Fear is simply fear and I believe it is always an uneasy experience.
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Jackson6612 What is an uneasy fear? Fear is simply fear and I believe it is always an uneasy experience.
What you say is true, but there's a whole spectrum of fear, and "uneasiness" is generally used to describe a very low level of nagging upset which is not enough to keep you from going about your business, but never allows you to relax completely.

I think "uneasiness" could also be used to describe a low level of excitement. That is, uneasiness is not necessarily fear, until it is so described.

- A.
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AvangiWhat you say is true, but there's a whole spectrum of fear, and "uneasiness" is generally used to describe a very low level of nagging upset which is not enough to keep you from going about your business, but never allows you to relax completely.

I think "uneasiness" could also be used to describe a low level of excitement. That is, uneasiness is not necessarily fear, until it is so described.

- A.

A boy thinking very excitedly about the things he would do when he go for camping with his classmates. At the same time he is worried about spending the nigh in a forest. This is perhaps what you would call an uneasy excitement.

You said: That is, uneasiness is not necessarily fear, until it is so described.
Would it be wrong to say: ...until it is described so?
Jackson6612 A boy thinking very excitedly about the things he would do when he go for camping with his classmates. At the same time he is worried about spending the nigh in a forest. This is perhaps what you would call an uneasy excitement. I agree.

You said: That is, uneasiness is not necessarily fear, until it is so described.
Would it be wrong to say: ...until it is described so? I'm afraid my language is sometimes a little old fashioned. "Thus" and "so" are interchangeable in my sentence. The inversion you suggest is probably okay, but doesn't sound quite natural to me.

"So" would be natural at the end of the imperative, "[Please] say it isn't so," or the question, "Why didn't you tell me so?", or the reply, "When may I go out to play?" (reply) "When I say so."
Thank you very much.

Best wishes,
Jackson
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