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Hello

For verbs which take gerund(admit, suggest, advice etc) , if these take objective pronounWould we replace ing with infinitive?
Eg. I suggest reading the book(no object) now of we add objective pronounI suggest him to read/reading the book.
Or i dont mind delaying the launch I dont mind him to delay/delaying the lauch
'with objects or objective pronouns we always use infinitve never ing', right? How to decide, for a non native speaker?
Just a follow up query
If such verbs (which take gerund) are used in passive construction, would these still take gerund or infinitive or do we need to use relative pronouns?
Eg. It is suggested to read/reading Or should we say- suggested that reading
It is advised to read/reading
Normally we would always use i advice reading but in passive im not sure?Thanks
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There is no overall rule for all catenative verbs; you have to learn the patterns of usage for each one. Because the usage is complex, please ask about one verb at a time. That keeps it simple for us to give a good answer and it makes it easier for you, too.


The verb "suggest" is monotransitive; it takes only one object.

Here are the active forms:

He suggested reading this book.
He suggested that I read this book.

X He suggested me reading this book. (Incorrect)
X He suggested me to read this book. (Incorrect)

Here are some examples of passive forms. The passive is less common than the active.

It was suggested that I read this book.  ("It was suggested" is the most common passive.)
It was suggested to him that he study Chemical Engineering.
Jones was suggested (as the man) to replace Smith as goalkeeper.

I found one example of the passive with a gerund clause as the subject. It is not used very often at all.

Charging for parking on the weekends was suggested by a citizen in a recent town hall meeting.

Here is a good reference on the different types of verbs.

https://parentingpatch.com/english-verbs-copular-intransitive-transitive-ditransitive-ambitrans

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anonymousFor verbs which take gerund(admit, suggest, advise etc)

The verb advise (advice is the noun) is ditransitive.

Here are some examples of the active voice.

The teacher advised reading the book a second time to better understand it.
The teacher advised me to read this book.
The teacher advised my brother to read this book.

X The teacher advised me reading this book. (Incorrect)

Here are the passive voice examples.

I was advised by the teacher to read this book.
Paris was advised to give up football because of a heart ailment.
Reading the book several times was advised. (awkward. )
Taking one tablet three times a day was advised. (awkward. )

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Comments  

Sure AlpheccaStars, thankyou

so basically its correct to say that for ditransitive verbs, we always use infinitve after indirect object or objective pronouns, using ing after object is grammatically wrong irrespective of the verb used. This was exactly the point i mentioned above.


Secondly in case of passive constructs is it wrong

To read the book several times was advised?


Thanks again

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anonymousso basically its correct to say that for ditransitive verbs, we always use infinitve after indirect object or objective pronouns, using ing after object is grammatically wrong irrespective of the verb used. This was exactly the point i mentioned above.

You have to consider these verbs individually. I would not guarantee that one rule would apply to all ditransitive catenative verbs.

That is exactly my reply to you in my first response.

Sure Alpheccastars, understood. And thank-you for replying.

Just incase if you recall some examples where we use participle ing with objective pronouns/indrirect object. please let me know as i cannot think of any else its fine.

Also in passive construction, specifically in case of verb advice would It be wrong to say-- to read book several times was advised.

Thanks you again

anonymousJust incase if you recall some examples where we use participle ing with objective pronouns/indrirect object. please let me know as i cannot think of any else its fine.

As you read and study English books and text, you can be on the lookout for examples.
There are sentences where the present participle follows an objective pronoun.

Mary appreciated me speaking my mind in support of her position.
anonymousAlso in passive construction, specifically in case of verb advice would It be wrong to say-- to read book several times was advised.

It is grammatical, but very stilted. People use such language if they want to make themselves appear erudite and vastly superior to others. It is generally a farce.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Sure

.

One more thing dont you agree that in all such examples( pronoun+ verb ing) we have actually removed the preposition, gerund participle is not directly following by object.

For eg. He appreciated me for doing this

Same goes for the case of using ing after adjective

He is busy in doing what(busy doing what) ?

Normally we always use infinitve after adjective

So more less we are using ing after preposition which has been reduced be it objective pronouns/indirect object or an adjective?

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