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Hi Hancus

1/ Could you give me a link where I can find:

a/ any exact American standard definitions about the economy, finance, banking...

b/ any exact English standard definitions about the economy, finance, banking...

c/ any lessons of grammar. (that means if want to search the use of "gerund", I only type gerund and that'll appear).

d/ any meanings of idioms.

e/ American dictionary

f/ English dictionary.

2/ Please correct (1/)

Quoc
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Hi guys,

If I may comment on this little issue about names, I think it's a cultural matter.

In Canada, consider Tom Smith. 'Tom' is his personal name, and 'Smith' is his family name. When he comes home from work, his wife says 'Hi, Tom'.

Now let's consider, I hope with his permission Emotion: smile, 'Tung Quoc'. It's not absolutely clear to me what his personal name is. Is it the first one or the second one? If it's the second one, I can see how Quoc would then be confused when looking at a name like Marius Hancu.

Tung Quoc, can you comment please? What does your wife call you?Emotion: smile

As regards acronyms, WS does not seem like one to me.

Best wishes, Clive
Tung Quoc seems to be a Vietnamese name.
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Hi Clive,

My wife will say Hi, Quoc.

1/ BTW, you wrote WS, what is the meaning of WS?

2/ For Tom Smith, when do you say Tom, when do you say Smith?

Q
Hi Quoc,

My wife will say Hi, Quoc. Tom Smith's wife will say 'Hi, Tom'. In other words, Western names use the opposite order. This can obviously cause some confusion.

1/ BTW, you wrote WS, what is the meaning of WS? William Shakespeare.

2/ For Tom Smith, when do you say Tom, when do you say Smith? Generally speaking, N. America is probably much more informal than many other parts of the world. First names (Tom) are commonly used. Socially, by Tom's friends, at work by his co-workers and very often also by his boss. He will also call his boss by his first name (I'm speaking of offices, I'm not so sure about factories).

Last name (Mr. Smith) is used much less often. In a more formal situation. In a place where he is a customer, eg a store or office. By strangers. By children.

The last name without a title , ie Smith without Mr., is seldom used. It can show rudeness or that the speaker has considerable authority over Tom Smith.

It's an interesting topic. Emotion: smile I spend a lot of time discussing this in class.

Best wishes, Clive

Hi,

MC wrote The last name is used by your boss at the office.

You idea is the first name is used between friends, at work by co-workers and by boss. Sb can also call his boss by his first name.

So, in offices, when should I use first name, when should I use last name? Can I also call my boss by his last name? Why?

Quoc
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In most offices, you would call your boss by his first name.

There are very few cases in which you would call someone using ONLY his last name, "Smith" without the courtesy title, "Mr. Smith."

I would say that if you worked in a office, you would call your boss Tom if you were in the U.S. In other places, you might call him "Mr. Smith." I would strongly advise NOT calling him "Smith."

I think this is what Clive said too.
You wrote:

I would say that if you worked in a office, you would call your boss Tom if you were in the U.S. In other places, you might call him "Mr. Smith." I would strongly advise NOT calling him "Smith.".

Here, might = should ?

Q
Hi Quoc,

I would say that if you worked in a office, you would call your boss Tom if you were in the U.S. In other places, you might call him "Mr. Smith."

Here, might = should ? No, 'might' here = possibility. Different countries/cultures often have different customs about the level of formality, so when you move to a new country/culture you need to listen/observe/ask about such matters.

Best wishes, Clive
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Just a point on the use of the terms "first name" and "last name": it's far better to talk about "personal name" and "surname" because, as we see in Quoc's case, in many non-European languages the personal name comes after the surname and is therefore, strictly, the "last name", creating no end of confusion.
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