Hi teachers,

Is it necessary 'the' before past participle or it is optional in this explanation?

To form present perfect yes / no questions, use the auxiliary verb have/has with the principal verb in (the) past participle.

Thanks in advance
1 2
Hi,

Is it necessary 'the' before past participle or it is optional in this explanation?

To form present perfect yes / no questions, use the auxiliary verb have/has with the principal verb in (the) past participle.

Both versions sound awkward to me.

If you want to change as few words as possible, I suggest

To form present perfect yes / no questions, use the auxiliary verb have/has with the principal verb in past participle form.

I assume that you wlll also talk about the correct word order for such questions.Emotion: smile

Clive

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Hi Clive,

Thank you for your answer.

I assume that you will also talk about the correct word order for such questions.

Yes. I do. In fact, there is a chart below the explanation with examples using: 'I, you, he, etc.'Emotion: wink

Is this one correct then?

To form present progressive affirmative sentences, use the correct forms of the auxiliary verb be
(am, is, are) with the principal verb ending in“-ing”.

Thanks.
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Hi,

Is this one correct then?

To form present progressive affirmative sentences, use the correct forms of the auxiliary verb be
(am, is, are) with the principal verb ending in“-ing”.

It seems awkward to say 'the principal verb ending in“-ing”.

Why not just say 'the present participle of the main verb'?

Clive
Hi Clive,

Thank you for your reply.

Beileve it or not I took the definitions from the Internet.Emotion: sad

Besides saying 'the present participle of the main verb', can I also say:

a) '... with the gerund of the main verb'

b) '... with the base form of verb + -ing'

Is it also possible to say: '... with the main verb in the present participle'.

What about this one for the Simple Present? Is it fine?

To form simple present questions, use the auxiliary verb do/does with the base form of the main verb.

Thanks
Hi,

Besides saying 'the present participle of the main verb', can I also say:

a) '... with the gerund of the main verb' No, definitely not. The term 'gerund' si used when the -ing form is used like a noun. That is not the case here.

b) '... with the base form of verb + -ing' Why not just call it the Present Participle?

Your description does not fit all verbs, eg smile / smiling, run / running.

Is it also possible to say: '... with the main verb in the present participle'. No, awkward.

What about this one for the Simple Present? Is it fine?

To form simple present questions, use the auxiliary verb do/does with the base form of the main verb. Yes.

Clive
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Thinking SpainTo form simple present questions, use the auxiliary verb do/does with the base form of the main verb.
I take it you are deliberately omitting constuctions with is, are, etc., and anything with a modal verb.

He is rich. / Is he rich? (No do/does.)

He can speak French. / Can he speak French? (No do/does.)

CJ
Hi Clive,

Thank you for your reply.

I've read quite a few times that the 'base form' of a verb has other different names.

It can also be called 'dictionary form', 'root form', 'verb root', and 'simple form'.

They are all possible, aren't they?

TS
Hi CalifJim,

Well, not really. The thing is I didn't explain the whole thing. Let me tell you that below the chart where I explain the Grammar Rule for do or does + the base form + etc. There is another one that says:

Exception to the Rule

Exclude the auxiliary verbs can and must and the verb be from the rule. They can’t be used with the auxiliary verb do or does.

TS




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