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I was wondering, why is it that so many foreign singers can sing in a perfect North American accent yet have a thick accent when it comes to holding a conversation?

Much of what is perceived as accent in speech isn't emphasized in singing, or otherwise falls away.

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I was wondering, why is it that so many foreign singers can sing in a perfect North American accent yet have a thick accent when it comes to holding a conversation?

I wonder if this is related to a similar phenomenon I noticed when CB radios were common. Speakers who were otherwise completely unremarkable in their diction, invariably assumed a southern country-hick accent when talking on the air. In discussing this with some of them, it became apparent that this was not done with conscious effort, but in fact took a lot of effort to overcome.

Jitze
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I was wondering, why is it that so many foreign ... a thick accent when it comes to holding a conversation?

Because singing isn't conversing, of course.
I wonder if this is related to a similar phenomenon I noticed when CB radios were common. Speakers who were ... became apparent that this was not done with conscious effort, but in fact took a lot of effort to overcome.

People who sing country music and bluegrass tend to sing it with a "country" accent because that's the way they learned it. We know some Dutch bluegrass performers, and they sound like Nashville when they're singing. But, as the original poster said, not when they're talking.

Learning songs by ear is purely a process of listening and imitating. Generating and uttering meaningful sentences is a whole nuther kettle of fish, involving intent, vocabulary, grammar, emotion, stress, watching for comprehension, etc. People with good musical ears are probably better at imitating the various sounds of a language than those without, but it's still not enough to grant you a perfect accent while talking.

Best - Donna Richoux
An American living in the Netherlands
I wonder if this is related to a similar phenomenon I noticed when CB radios were common. Speakers who were ... became apparent that this was not done with conscious effort, but in fact took a lot of effort to overcome.

That might also be related, or comparable, to the "Chuck Yeager" accent that has been adopted by all commercial airplane pilots in the US.

I repeat: Erk, this can't be!
I was wondering, why is it that so many foreign ... have a thick accent when itcomes to holding a conversation?

I wonder if this is related to a similar phenomenon I noticed when CB radios were common. Speakers who were ... it became apparent that this was not done with conscious effort, but in fact took a lot of effort toovercome.

Y'mean lahk ayerlahn pahlut tawk, according to Tom Wolfe?

Mike.
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I wonder if this is related to a similar phenomenon ... effort, but in fact took a lot of effort to

overcome. Y'mean lahk ayerlahn pahlut tawk, according to Tom Wolfe?

No, see, that's "Chuck Yeager Standard" (CYS).
Not quite that Southern, actually. Closer to TCE, I believe.
Y'mean lahk ayerlahn pahlut tawk, according to Tom Wolfe?

No, see, that's "Chuck Yeager Standard" (CYS). Not quite that Southern, actually. Closer to TCE, I believe.

Sorry, suh. Yor post about good ole Chuck hadn arrahvd. There's a social thing of interest here: the Empire reassurance-voice is more the newsreader not-too-RP thing. (The US actor Kerry Shale, who seems to be on permanent secondment to the BBC, does a fine Australian radio announcer: reminds me of my father.)

Mike.
Jitze Couperus filted:
I wonder if this is related to a similar phenomenon I noticed when CB radios were common. Speakers who were ... became apparent that this was not done with conscious effort, but in fact took a lot of effort to overcome.

At the time, the CB thing was known as an "Arkahoma" accent...if you had relatives from the right part of the country around you as a child, you can drop into it without even realizing it..
Besides, "mercy, good buddy, we got a clean copy on you for sure; looks like you're hittin' us with a big eight-pounder; we goin' ten-ten on the side and we'll catch you on the flip-flop" sounds ridiculous in Brooklynese..r
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No, see, that's "Chuck Yeager Standard" (CYS). Not quite that Southern, actually. Closer to TCE, I believe.

Sorry, suh. Yor post about good ole Chuck hadn arrahvd. There's a social thing of interest here: the Empire reassurance-voice ... seems to be on permanent secondment to the BBC, does a fine Australian radio announcer: reminds me of my father.)

Never herd that 'un. Wot's a blackmarketeer Melberger sahnd loik? Just another Mick wrenched from cuttink Lunnon cits' purses?
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