I need some help with these sentences, the correct analysis is given.. But I don`t understand why it is like this...

I (S)found (V) the book on the shelf (d.O)

I would analyse "on the shelf" as an adverbial and the book as an d.O.. Why is the whole thing a direct object? because it is a noun phrase?

And what about this?

John Brown(S) published(V) a book about those two years (d.O)

In my analysis I had "a book" as direct object, and those two years as object predicative..

I guess I don`t get how to recognize a direct object, please help.. Any tips?
The direct object is the one that receives the action of the verb.

I read that "book" is the DO, while "on the shelf" is a prepositional phrase. "Shelf" is the object of the preposition.

The second example is similar, I think that "about those two years" is a prepositional phrase as well.
In my opinion, it's argumentative.

Do we include its modifiers or not?

It's like the simple subject of the sentence vs. the subject of the sentence.

But we don't have a term, "The simple direct object of the verb."

If the modifier comes before the noun, we're more inclined to include it.

Mary chose the blue car with the convertible top.

I think we'd all agree that the direct object is "the blue car." (Very few would say it's "car.")

Some of us would include the modifying prepositional phrase which follows, and some would not.

(I would not.)

Mary chose the blue car for her daughter.

We tend to think of this prepositional phrase as an indirect object, so would clearly not include it as part of the direct object.

I haven't used the term "object predicative," but it seems to suggest that the phrase it applies to is related to the object.

It doesn't specify "direct object predicative."

Do you have a definition?

I bought my wife of two years a new car.

This prepositional phrase is a post modifier of the indirect object. Would you consider it an "object predicative"?
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Object Predicative: "The object predicative gives a description of the direct object, and can thus only occur in sentences that also contain a direct object. It is typically realized by an adjective, adjective phrase, a pronoun, a noun or a noun phrase.

My problem is that I don`T understand what to include in every constituents... Like I said, I would analyse the direct object as "the book" and "on the shelf " as adverbial. ( the whole sentence being: I found the book on the shelf"..

Yes, on the shelf is a prep phrase, but in my textbook it says that these are often analyzed as adverbials.. And adverbials tell us place, time and manner of the action.. Isn`t "on the shelf" something telling us about place? But my teacher told me the whole thing is a direct object, which I don`t get...
Thanks for this!

After being distracted (sorry), I fully agree with your adverbial analysis of the prepositional phrase. It does seem obvious to me now. (I found the book on the shelf.)

If it had been, "I found the book with the missing chapter," then we could clearly argue that the prepositional phrase is adjectival, and MAY be considered as part of the direct object.

Which book did you find? (reply) The one on the bookshelf, dummy!

Seems absurd, doesn't it? Emotion: big smile
Adonica86 It is typically realized by an adjective, adjective phrase, a pronoun, a noun or a noun phrase.
I does seem strange that "prepositional phrase" is not included. Perhaps phrases are listed here by their functions.
Adonica86I need some help with these sentences, the correct analysis is given.. But I don`t understand why it is like this...
I (S)found (V) the book on the shelf (d.O)
I would analyse "on the shelf" as an adverbial and the book as an d.O.. Why is the whole thing a direct object? because it is a noun phrase?
You're analysis is correct. The preposition phrase "on the shelf" can be a noun modifier and therefore part of the direct object in sentences like "I must read the book on the shelf". But your sentence is different because "on the shelf" is related to the verb "found". So the analysis is: I (s) found (v) the book (obj) on the shelf (adv).

Adonica86And what about this?
John Brown(S) published(V) a book about those two years (d.O)
In my analysis I had "a book" as direct object, and those two years as object predicative..
I guess I don`t get how to recognize a direct object, please help.. Any tips?
You're correct that "a book" is direct object here, but the preposition phrase "about those two years" modifies it, so the direct object in full is "a book about those two years". Objective predicative complements are usually adjective phrases like "I consider Jim untrustworthy" or noun phrases like "They elected him president".

BillJ
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Thank you very much for your time, I really appreciate you clearing this up for me!!!! This site is amazing, so many kind hearted people giving good help in return for nothing.. Emotion: smile