Hi Teachers,

Do these sentences have similar meanings?

a) She has had dinner alone quite a few times since she got married.

b) She has had dinner alone many times since she got married.

Thanks in advance
1 2
Thinking SpainHi Teachers,
Do these sentences have similar meanings?
a) She has had dinner alone quite a few times since she got married.
b) She has had dinner alone many times since she got married.
Hi,

No. Quite a few means some.

Regards
Hi Regards,

Thank you so much for your answer. But I've found 'many' as a synonym of 'quite a few' too. So I'm really puzzled.

TS
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Thinking SpainBut I've found 'many' as a synonym of 'quite a few' too.
Hi,

Where?

Regards
Thinking SpainHi Regards,
Here
Hi,

Quite frankly, I don't think so. To me, many denotes a greater quantity of something than quite a few does.

I wouldn't consider them synonyms, then.

Regards
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Hi Regards,

Thank you for your replies I really appreciate them. That's why I've asked, to have another opinion.

Best,

TS
'Quite a few' certainly means more than just 'some' in British English. I would suggest it's not as much as 'many' and more around 'a lot of'.
Hi,

Here's another opinion.

Such 'number' expressions are hard to define precisely, although learners often ask for such defintions.

'Some' is a rather neutral expression.

On the other hand, 'quite a few' often adds a bit of tone, a bit of attitude.

eg Mary had some drinks at the office party. Sounds like a statement of fact.

eg Mary had quite a few drinks at the office party. Sounds like 'more than one might expect'.

eg Mary had quite a few drinks at her mother's funeral. Sounds like the speaker is implying disapproval.

Then, on top of all that, consider understatement.

eg Mary has won quite a few races. She is the best runner who has ever lived.

Clive
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