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Dear all,

I have seen the following sentence in a grammar book. Here after "did", the word "notice" is given in the present tense form, the rule is correctly observed here. But I can't understand why again "come" is given in its present tense form. Kindly enlighten me on this.

1) The TV was so loud, he didn't notice me come in.


Thank you.

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cat navy 425But I can't understand why again "come" is given in its present tense form.

After verbs of perception, the base form or the present participle is used. "Notice" is one of many verbs of perception.

Base form:

I heard her come in.
I saw her come in.
I felt the mosquito bite my arm.

Participle:

I heard the children playing in the park.
I saw her walking down the street.
I felt the insect crawling up my leg.

Comments  
cat navy 4251) The TV was so loud, he didn't notice me come in.

That strikes a sour note for me. "Notice" is wrong there to my ear. "See" or "hear" are right, but with "notice" I want "he didn't notice that I came in." The comma is wrong, too. If we make it "The TV was so loud he didn't hear me come in", "come" is the bare infinitive in a clause that is the direct object of "hear". Oddly enough, in traditional grammar the subject of an infinitive is in the objective case, "me" here.

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anonymous
cat navy 4251) The TV was so loud, he didn't notice me come in.

That strikes a sour note for me. "Notice" is wrong there to my ear. "See" or "hear" are right, but with "notice" I want "he didn't notice that I came in." The comma is wrong, too. If we make it "The TV was so loud he didn't hear me come in", "come" is the bare infinitive in a clause that is the direct object of "hear". Oddly enough, in traditional grammar the subject of an infinitive is in the objective case, "me" here.


The TV was so loud he didn't notice me come in.

I wouldn't go along with all that you say. It's just "me" that is the direct object, and the reason that "come in" is an infinitival clause is because "notice" is a verb of sensory perception which requires either an infinitival complement or a gerund-participial one ("The TV was so loud he didn't hear me come in / coming in").

The underlined element is a complex catenative construction where syntactically it is only the noun "me" that is intervening between the two verbs "notice" and "come" that is the direct object of "notice". "Me" is also the understood subject of "come".

"Come in" is thus not part of the object, but a separate constituent -- a clause serving as catenative complement of "notice".

"Me" is called a 'raised object' because the verb it relates to syntactically is higher in the constituent structure than the one it relates to semantically.

 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.
Thanks a lot sir.
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Madam, thanks a lot.
BillJI wouldn't go along with all that you say.

Thanks for the expert clarification. I answer these sometimes hoping to spur you to action.

Thank you very much.
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