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Dear all,

I would like to know which of the following sentence pattern is commonly used by native speakers. Kindly tell me which of the following is good usage. I feel that the first sentence is not that good. It seems "They have appointed" is not a good usage. I would like to get an expert opinion on it.

They have appointed a new headteacher at my son's school.

A new headteacher has been appointed at my son's school.

At my son's school, a new school teacher has been appointed.

Thank you.

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Oddly, I'd expect the first to be the most commonly used. In speech, it'd almost always be 'They've...'

The use of the passive voice in the second is not so commonly used, but is perfectly good English. It's a bit more formal, perhaps - people tend not to use the passive voice in normal conversations.

The third is also perfectly acceptable, but I'd expect spoken English to put the prepositional phrase at the end of the sentence. Written English - well, that's a different story! We tend to be lazy and follow regular, common patterns when we speak. Most writers will be keen to avoid repetitive forms of sentence structure, but speaking follows simpler ways of doing things.

Comments  
cat navy 425They have appointed a new headteacher at my son's school.

This is natural. The structure with "they" is informal, and probably usual in everyday speech. Not every dictionary recognizes "headteacher", and I myself find it odd, I suppose because I don't pronounce it that way. Use "head teacher" or "principal".

cat navy 425A new headteacher has been appointed at my son's school.

This is passive and therefore to be used advisedly. It is natural and of no particular register.

cat navy 425At my son's school, a new school teacher has been appointed.

This would require a reason for the inversion. "Schoolteacher" is one word.

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 David Hatton's reply was promoted to an answer.
Thanks a lot for this valuable information.
Thanks a lot for this valuable note.
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