Hi teachers,

If this definition is correct:

When the verb 'feel' is used to express a physical or emotional sensation, with the exception of the tactile, it can be used with either the simple present or the present continuous.

Eg. He feels sick. He is feeling sick. He feels blue today. He is feeling blue today.

How come in this sentence, 'I feel that she doesn't like me' I can't use the present progressive if I'm expressing an emotional sensation?

Thanks in advance
1 2
Thinking SpainHow come in this sentence, 'I feel that she doesn't like me' I can't use the present progressive if I'm expressing an emotional sensation?
In the other examples, the feeling is a transitory condition. Someone who feels blue will cheer up. Someone who feels sick will feel better.

But if you don't like someone, or think someone does not like you, that is a condition that is not as likely to change.
Hi AlpheccaStars,

Thank you so much for your reply. That's quite an explanation! Now I understand it very well.

So the definition should be better like this:

When the verb 'feel' is used to express a transitory physical or emotional sensation, with the exception of the tactile, it can be used with either the simple present or the present continuous.

Am I right?

Best,

TS
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Yes, there are some situations where feel is more like a dynamic verb than a stative verb.

For example: I am feeling sick - it implies that this sensation of sickness just happened, particularly in the case of being faint or nauseated. It implies that the sickness is about to get worse.
Hi AlpheccaStars,

Thank you so much for your explanation. Now it is even clearer!

Best,

TS
Thinking SpainHow come in this sentence, 'I feel that she doesn't like me' I can't use the present progressive if I'm expressing an emotional sensation?
The problem is that you are not expressing an emotional sensation. You are expressing a judgment, a conclusion (She doesn't like me). It's the same as I believe that or I think that, as in

I [feel / believe / think] that ten sandwiches is too much to eat for lunch.

These are expressions of an emotional sensation.

I feel anger. / I am feeling anger. / I feel angry. / I'm feeling angry.

I feel joy. / I am feeling joy. / I feel joyful. / I'm feeling joyful.

Compare the case when you don't express an emotional sensation, but a conclusion - which just happens to be about someone else's emotional sensation:

I feel that you are angry. / But not: I am feeling that you are angry.

CJ
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Hi Jim,

Thank YOU so much for your reply. It is very, very clear.

a) Then this is an expression of a physical sensation. So it can be used with either the simple present or the present progressive.

Now I feel very tired, must be because of today’s work. / Now I am feeling very tired, must be because of today’s work.

b) Then this definition, as AlpheccaStars told me, is absolutely right too. She told me to use 'transitory' and I really agree with her.

When the verb 'feel' is used to express a transitory physical or emotional sensation, with the exception of the tactile, it can be used with either the simple present or the present continuous.

c) Are you using 'is' because the verb goes with 'for lunch'

I [feel / believe / think] that ten sandwiches is too much to eat for lunch.

Thanks
Thinking Spaina) Then this is an expression of a physical sensation. So it can be used with either the simple present or the present progressive.
Now I feel very tired; it must be because of today’s work. / Now I am feeling very tired; it must be because of today’s work.
Yes. Both are good.

Thinking Spainb) Then this definition, as AlpheccaStars told me, is absolutely right too. She told me to use 'transitory' and I really agree with her.
When the verb 'feel' is used to express a transitory physical or emotional sensation, with the exception of the tactile, it can be used with either the simple present or the present continuous.
Yes, but I don't think your 'exception' clause is quite right.

I would say that the exception is when 'feel' expresses an opinion, as 'believe' and 'think' do.

I don't see the tactile use of 'feel' as an exception.

As part of my job in the textile industry I feel the texture of fabrics to determine their quality.

I am feeling this fabric to determine its quality.

The first seems more long-term; the second seems more transitory, so I don't understand the sense in which you are saying that the tactile usage is an exception.

_______________

When entities are grouped and considered from the aspect of the total quantity they represent, they can be singular, thus:

Ten sandwiches is too much to eat in 15 minutes. (This quantity of sandwiches is ...)

Twenty dollars is not enough to cover the expenses. (This quantity of money is not ...)

Fifteen prime ministers in fifteen years is a sign of an unstable country. (This quantity of prime ministers is ...)

CJ
Hi Jim,

Thank you for your reply and corrections.

What can I say? It is an incredible explanation!!Emotion: nodding

The exception about the tactile was taken from the Internet and I myself didn't undertand it either.

_______________________________________

When the verb 'feel' is used to express a transitory physical or emotional sensation, it can be used with either the simple present or the present continuous.

How can I integrate you sentence 'I would say that the exception is when 'feel' expresses an opinion, as 'believe' and 'think'?

Could it be like this?

When the verb 'feel' is used to express a transitory physical or emotional sensation, it can be used with either the simple present or the present continuous, except when 'feel' expresses an opinion, as 'believe' and 'think'.

______________________________________

Could you tell me a couple of examples, besides the ones I give you, where 'feel' expresses a physical sensation?

I feel hungry, I feel thirsty, I feel tired. I feel sick.

Thanks once againEmotion: smile

TS
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