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Hi, I have a question regarding what tense to use in sentences that start with "If". From what I know sentences like "If I were there", and "If there was" the word "were" and "was" are in past tense. However, I'm still very confused. For instance, if I were to say "If you go to...", there isn't a need for the word "go" to be in past tense, is it? So I'm unsure on which occasion should I use past and present tense in the sentences that start with the word "If".

Sorry if the question is not clear, I don't really know how to put it.

Also, please help me check the structure/grammar of this sentence whether it is correct:

"My project idea has yet to be approved anyway, so if I force a start then redoing is a possibility."

Thanks in advance.
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The present tense is used when you are speaking of a present or future possibility:

If you go to the zoo today, you will see a polar bear.

The 'past' tense is used when you are speaking of an impossible or very unlikely present or future:

If you went to the North Pole today, you would see a polar bear.

I'm not sure of the meaning of your sentence, but:

My project idea has yet to be approved anyway, so if I am forced to (?) start, then redoing it is a possibility.

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Mister MicawberThe present tense is used when you are speaking of a present or future possibility:

If you go to the zoo today, you will see a polar bear.

The 'past' tense is used when you are speaking of an impossible or very unlikely present or future:

If you went to the North Pole today, you would see a polar bear.

I'm not sure of the meaning of your sentence, but:

My project idea has yet to be approved anyway, so if I am forced to (?) start, then redoing it is a possibility.

Thanks for the explanation, Mister Micawber.

As for the sentence, my meaning was that my project idea has yet to be approved, so if I am impatient and force myself to start, then redoing it is a possibility. So I'm not sure instead of saying that, I could use "if I force a start". (After seeing your correction, I doubt so now). Please confirm with me about this. Thanks again.
Oh, I see. I suggest that a very natural way of expressing that would be:

My project idea has yet to be approved anyway, so if I go ahead and start, then I may have to redo it.

conditional sentences are four types: the first is called probable condition in the future like if i see you at the party tomorrow, i will give the prize. if we meet in the conference hall tonight, we will take a group photo. the second is an unreal condition, or contrary to the fact condition or improbable condition or impossible condition to be fulfilled in the present time because there is no time for the condition to be met, so tnere will be no result. such as if you went to the town now you could buy us some fish. there is now time for the action to be done now and now is a short period of time it finishes as soon i finish my sentence. the condition is unreal and the result can't be shown. if you studied for the exam, you would pass but there is no time for him to study and consequently to pass. the fact is he doesn't study so he won't pass. when we convert into a conditional sentence the condition is opposite the fact and the tense becomes the past of that in the fact. the third is an unreal condition in the past. the condition is opposite the fact and the tense is the past of that in the fact. he didn't study so he didn't pass. if he had studied, he would have passed. the past from the simple past is past perfect. when the statement in the fact is positive the condition is negative and vice versa.
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