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Dear all,

I am helping my friend to write a letter to apply for a scholorship. Could you please tell me about the word 'approve'...?

Which sentence is correct?

1: I approve Miss. Thae's theme, and the intention of a research.

2: I approve TO Miss. Thae's theme, and the intention of a research.

Does it need "to" in the sentence?
Or both are correct with different meanigs?
To me the sentence 1 sounds more natural...
I would appreciate someone's advice.

Thank you in advance,

Yuuki
Comments  
I approve Miss Thae's theme and the intention of research.

Approve doesn't need a "to" after it.
Hi,

Well, it depends on what you mean. There are two ways to use 'approve'.

1: I approve Miss. Thae's theme, and the intention of a research. To approve something means to confirm it or authorize it.

2: I approve OF Miss. Thae's theme, and the intention of a research. If I approve of something, it means I consider it to be good, like a good idea.

So, are you giving approval or giving a reference/recommendation? I assume the latter. If you mean the former, you need to use past tense.

A minor comment is that 'intention of research' seems a tiny bit strange to me. I'd perhaps say something like 'the direction of her research'. You need 'her', 'a' is wrong here.

Best wishes, Clive

Best wishes, Clive
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Dear Vopar,

Thank you very much for your advice!
It is appreciated.

Best regards,
Yuuki
Dear Clive,

Thank you very much for your kind reply and advice.
This is such an amazing site for people like me who is trying to study English. and Clive, You are a star!

Well, this time, I am trying to translate a reference for my friend so I think will say (and modify) like this:
1: I approve Miss. Thae's theme and the intention(or direction) of her research.

If it is ok to ask...
Why did you suggest the word 'direction' instead of 'intention'?
Is that because 'direction' sounds more objective than 'intention' (thus people may feel the research would be more logical and objective i.e. not too subjective)?
It will be very nice if you can explain the difference of the nuance of those two words in this context.
I find it very interesting...

Thank you very much again,

Best regards,
Yuuki
Hi Yuuki,

I'm glad that what I wrote was helpful to you.

Well, this time, I am trying to translate a reference for my friend so I think will say (and modify) like this:
1: I approve Miss. Thae's theme and the intention(or direction) of her research. 'Approve' still sounds a bit like 'authorize' to me, in the sense of giving permission. You might consider another verb, like '
I support ...'

Why did you suggest the word 'direction' instead of 'intention'?
Is that because 'direction' sounds more objective than 'intention' (thus people may feel the research would be more logical and objective i.e. not too subjective)? Yes, basically. 'Intention of research' sounds to me a little bit like the researcher has already made up her mind about the results, that she is not completely objective.


Clive
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Dear Clive,

Thank you so much for your tips,
you solved my problems completely.

Very good explanation.

Thanks again,

Yuuki