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Which is correct?

1. Problem will start to + verb

2. Problem will starting to + verb

And

Should I add "ing" to the verb?

Thanks
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Hello Newcomer,

These two are the same: The water will start to boil after about ten minutes on high heat. AND The water will start boiling after about ten minutes on high heat.

You can also say: The water is [now] starting to boil.

To say "the water will starting to boil" is wrong.

However, you can say: Check to stove is about ten minutes: the water will be starting to boil.
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One more question.

You say im looking forward to starting instead of looking forward to start right?

Im confused, it seems in some cases you do add ing to verb and in some you dont (I mean other than normal sentences like I am going, I will be playing etc.)
NewcomerWhich is correct? 1. Problem will start to + verb 2. Problem will starting to + verb And Should I add "ing" to the verb? Thanks
will is used here to make the future tense

the future tense = will + infinitive

  • I play => I will play
  • I read => I will read
  • I start => I will start


  • Now, start is both transitive and intransitive verb, i.e. may and may not require object

    • The man starts the project. (start = begin something - transitive)
    • The film starts at 9 o'clock. (start = begin - intransitive)
    • Please don't start! (start = begin arguing - intransitive)


    • The meaning of start is slightly different for each transitive and intransitive case.

      If the verb is transitive you can usually use (but read ahead)

      I like something => I like walking. = I like the action of walking

      otherwise you say

      I like to do something => I like to walk. = I like to perform the action of walking

      I hope you can feel the difference, but I'll explain. walking is an object, thus in the next case you have no options it must be I like his walking, because his walking is an object. There is no way to say for example, I like him/his to walk??

      Not all but some verbs are strict: they require either +infinitve. To feel when you need +infinitive all I can say is that if the action is possible or is already happening and verb asks very strongly for an object you should consider , if the action is not desirable, not possible, and not executable and a verb does not require very strongly an object you should think about to+infinitive.

      only with admit avoid consider deny dislike enjoy excuse finish imagine report suggest

      only with to+infinitive are for example apply, fail, hesitate, hurry, manage, offer, prepare, refuse, seek

      For example to avoid something you should be able to perform it first, to finish something as well, enjoy says that action is likely or wishfully in order, somebody enjoys action (like is not that strong as enjoy), however to fail says that you had no success, to refuse as well.

      to start something is half-half: you can start a possible action () or you can attempt something without special consideration about its final success (+to)

      (to stop something, which you may think should be similar, is only with , because you should be in an action first in order to be able to stop it)


      • to+infinitive gives only a name of action


      • So both of these are equally useful

        • The problem will start to bother us soon.
        • The problem will start bothering us soon.


        • It is just what you are concerned of better. start to bother slightly better says that you may still be able to handle the problem, start bothering says slightly better about your possible future headache with the problem Emotion: surprise). Yet, the difference is very slim. Sometimes you can't make a distinction. (I like to walk should say more that you maybe don't think about walking right now though you love it, I like walking says that you maybe like your current action or habit of walking. But, it is just maybe. I was more applying the rule to help you sense better what I want to explain. Some grammar books may suggest that there is no difference at all between +infinitive case when a verb is able to use both. I think that there is, but it is not always that important, neither catchy for an ordinary reader. Still, if you know this, you will at least understand what is the catch-22.)

          But, that is what is to it if you really want to know every perky detail.
NewcomerOne more question. You say im looking forward to starting instead of looking forward to start right? Im confused, it seems in some cases you do add ing to verb and in some you dont (I mean other than normal sentences like I am going, I will be playing etc.)
I am looking forward to it => I am looking forward to starting

(other explained above)

But, please, do not be confused here!!!

looking forward to is an expression on its own. to is a preposition from a phrasal verb like in look to. It does not belong to an infinitive, i.e. it is different from the case start to+infinitive
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