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Some managers think that grammar and punctuation (doesn't, don't) matter.

I've been thinking about this question for a few hours now. It's driving me insane. Since the subject "managers" is plural, doesn't the verb need to be "don't"?

Thank you ahead of time for your help,
Ben
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Welcome to the forums. This is a great place to learn.
don't is the form you want, but it has nothing to do with plurality of "managers": "grammar and punctuation" is a compound subject, thus requiring the form.
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bunyardIf a compound subject has both singular words, does it not have a singular verb agreement?
No. When you connect one thing to another thing, you've got more than one thing -- a plural.

So it's

The dog and the cat don't play well together.


Not:

*The dog and the cat doesn't play well together.


CJ
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Comments  
Where can I find information about compound subjects and their agreement with verbs? I thought that the verb "don't" goes with plural subjects and "doesn't" with singular. But I think that is only with 3rd person subjects. I think this is a 3rd person subject. If a compound subject has both singular words, does it not have a singular verb agreement?
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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