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Hello,

Please show me where the question mark should be placed (at position (A) or (B)) in the following sentence; and please explain your choice.

My friend warns, "Aren't you afraid your mother will ask, 'Are you ... (A) ' (B)"

Thank you in advance.
Hoa Thai
Comments  
Hi Hoa Thai

There are two questions, so I would use two question marks as well.

CB
Cool BreezeHi Hoa Thai

There are two questions, so I would use two question marks as well.

CB
Look like I have to pay for my friend's dinner tonight Emotion: smile
She asked me this question, and I told her that the asker really wants to ask "Are you crazy?", but inserts the question within another to soften the real comment. Thus, only one question mark is required and it would take position (A) (i.e., My friend warns, "Aren't you afraid your mother will ask, 'Are you crazy?'").

Thank you much!
Hoa Thai
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Hoa ThaiLook like I have to pay for my friend's dinner tonight Emotion: smile
Hi,
I guess nobody can lose or win here ... arguments supporting either views can be found!

1. a reference advocating two question marks:

The tone symbols should be placed before or after the second quotation mark according as they belong to the quotation or to the containing sentence. If both quotation and containing sentence need a tone symbol, both should be used, with the quotation mark between them.
...
Is the question 'Where was he?' or 'What was he doing?'?
2. a reference advocating one question mark only (inside the "inner" quotation marks) :

A single question mark will suffice to end a quoted question within a question:
"Didn't he ask, 'What did we do, who preceded you?'" queried Johnson.
3a. a reference advocating one question mark only (outside the quotation marks)

If the quotation is not a question, put the question mark outside the quotation marks. If the quoted material would normally end with a period, drop the period.
Who was it that said, “All that glitters is not gold” ?


3b. a reference advocating one question mark only (outside the quotation marks)

Does Dr. Lim always say to her students, "You must work harder"?
You could have dinner together and go Dutch Emotion: stick out tongue
Hoa ThaiThus, only one question mark is required and it would take position (A) (i.e., My friend warns, "Aren't you afraid your mother will ask, 'Are you crazy?'").
Hi Hoa Thai

One will do. Two may look prettier to some. You don't seriously think there is agreement on a thing like this? Emotion: surprise

CB
TanitI guess nobody can lose or win here ... arguments supporting either views can be found!
Cool BreezeOne will do. Two may look prettier to some. You don't seriously think there is agreement on a thing like this? Emotion: surprise
Thank you all for the comments! It is never too late to find helpful and constructive opinions; BTW, I did happily take my friend out to dinner tonight. Emotion: smile

I could certainly show this to her tommorow morning; and maybe she will return in kind with lunch.Emotion: smile

Good way for friends to find reasons to go out and have fun together anyway.

Best Regards,
Hoa Thai
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Hoa ThaiGood way for friends to find reasons to go out and have fun together anyway.

That's really nice and wise. Emotion: big smile
Consider the following:

"Are you coming to dinner," asked Sandra.

"Are you coming to dinner?" asked Sandra.

I see both of the above used in writing. It seems that in the first example, the coma incorporates the question mark much like a pronoun incorporates the identity of the person referenced. Any thoughts?