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Interior ministry spokesman Brig Javed Iqbal Cheema said on Friday that she was killed when the force of the bomb blast knocked her head against a sun roof fitting, and was not hit by bullets.
The PPP has insisted she was killed by two bullets, one of which pierced her skull and another which hit her in the neck.
The assassination opened the question of whether elections due on 8 January would go ahead as planned.
The ruling party says they are likely to be delayed for several weeks, on the grounds that the vote would "lose credibility" if held under current conditions.
Opposition parties have been calling for a delay, amid widespread unrest and political disarray following the murder of Ms Bhutto.
Tariq Azim of the ruling PML-Q party said a delay would allow the PPP more time to re-organise.
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I don't question about the elections in Pakistan.
Recently I learnt the above is wrong. It should be the following:
I don't question the elections in Pakistan.
Now look at the following sentence of the above:
The assassination opened the question of whether elections due on 8 January would go ahead as planned.
Is it correct to say 'the question of whether elections ...?
It may be the following:
The assassination opened the question whether elections due on 8 January would go ahead as planned.
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Now look at the following sentence of the above:

The assassination opened the question of whether elections due on 8 January would go ahead as planned.

Is it correct to say 'the question of whether elections ...? Yes.

It may be the following: ??? Maybe it should be the following:

The assassination opened the question whether elections due on 8 January would go ahead as planned.

No. It need not be question whether. It can be question whether, but it does not have to be.

CJ
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CalifJim wrote the following:

It may be the following: ??? Maybe it should be the following:

I think it is always correct to say somethink like 'it may be he is rich/tired.

I can't understand the flaw when saying 'it may be the following'.
You're asking questions.

You just finished asking Is it correct ...?

Then you say It may be the following:

which means: It is possible that it is the following:
or: It is permitted to be the following:

And you give another sentence.

The reader expects another question or a statement of doubt after asking Is it correct ...?
The reader does not expect an affirmative which sounds like you just answered your own question!

The sequence you wrote sounds like this:

Is it correct to say He are sick?
It is permitted to say He is tired.


Do you see how the second sentence somehow lacks a logical relationship to the first?

CJ
Thanks CalifJim

So the flaw lies in affirmative nature. I never thought of it.
I thought you are free to ask or rather formulate sentences when asking questions.
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