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At dinner this evening, a guest said, "I have no bread". Another guest said that was incorrect, this statement presented a double negative. The correct statement should be, " I don't have any bread". I argued that "I have no bread" is correct and proper, to me, even preferred over I don't have any bread. Who is right?
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Welcome to EnglishForward, mbyoh!

Both "I have no bread" and "I don't have any bread" are correct. Neither one contains a double negative. Neither one is necessarily preferred. The form with the (incorrect) double negative is "I don't have no bread".

California Jim
Jim:
The form with the (incorrect) double negative is "I don't have no bread".


Double negatives are not "incorrect". They are merely nonstandard. The difference is one that is clearly recognized by language scientists.
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I is truly graitfull 4 ur konteebyushin. you is reely a good helpor 4 all are studints. wunze day lissins 2 U -- denn dayz gonna have real gud ingritch. I duzn't hardley blames U tho' cuz U obeeyussley not having had no much larning wut wiff diss heer eingltich.

I don't spose U got no objekshins 2 thiss heer non-standizashin-tipe stuff. Glldd to heer i kin rite how i wants & U like soe gud all wut I riites. , no mattterring how i does it.
"I have no bread" sounds perfectly reasonable to me.
What a wonderfully constructive way to address the issues, Jim. I'm impressed!
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On the contrary, JT. Your protest proves Jim's point.

MrP
What protest, Mr P; I was suitably impressed.
The difference is one that is clearly recognized by language scientists.


Sounds like a new religion; What do they quantify?
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