Hi teachers,

Would you correct this explanation? Is it fine? What about the punctuation?

The Present Perfect shows the present situation in relation to a past action. In other words, for the Present Perfect the past is relevant to the present; the past has present consequences.

Thanks in advance
Thinking SpainHi teachers, Would you correct this explanation? Is it fine? What about the punctuation?The Present Perfect shows the present situation in relation to a past action. In other words, for the Present Perfect the past is relevant to the present; the past has present consequences. Thanks in advance
No, I don't like that explanation. It's not accurate.

I don't have time to elaborate now; I will do it later.
Thinking SpainHi teachers, Would you correct this explanation? Is it fine? What about the punctuation?The Present Perfect shows the present situation in relation to a past action. In other words, for the Present Perfect the past is relevant to the present; the past has present consequences. Thanks in advance
Both present perfect tense and simple past tense can show the past being relevant to the present.

A. I am surprised that you know so much about Europe.

B. That is because I have lived in France for four years. (B is still living in France.)

B. That is because I lived in France for four years. (B is no longer living in France. She lived there from 2006 to 2010.)

So what present perfect is showing in the above sentence is the (present)(ongoing) situation, the fact that B is still living in France. Both tenses show relevance to the present; they both explain why B (presently) knows so much about Europe.
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Hi Canadian45,

Thank you so much for your detailed explanation.

canadian45So what present perfect is showing in the above sentence is the (present)(ongoing) situation, the fact that B is still living in France. Both tenses show relevance to the present; they both explain why B (presently) knows so much about Europe.
It is a very good example. It really is. Never thought about that. Though in your sentence you are using the preposition 'for' which always connects past to present in a Present Perfect sentence. Then, what should be a fine explanation to introduce the Present Perfect.

Another example:

A: Would you like something to eat?

B: I'm not hungry. I've just had my lunch. (the past is relevant to the present)

The person had his lunch at two. Now it is six o'clock. He may be hungry now.

A: Would you like something to eat?

B: Sure.... (the past is not relevant to the present)

TS
Hi again,

Would you agree with this one?

The present perfect is used to express a past time (that is) related to the present in some way. Sometimes the past action is very recent, or it is still continuing at the present moment, or we don't know exactly when the past action happened. We only know that it happened sometime before the present.

We only know that it happened sometime before now.

Is it '(that is)' abosultely necessary?

TS
Thinking SpainHi Canadian45,Thank you so much for your detailed explanation.
It is a very good example. It really is. Never thought about that.

Though in your sentence you are using the preposition 'for' which always connects past to present in a Present Perfect sentence.

That's not true.

'I (have) discovered many uses for it.'

The above sentence is only a statement of fact; it is not connecting the past to the present.

Then, what would be a fine good explanation way to introduce the Present Perfect.

three answers......

1. If you are a teacher, have your students first thoroughly understand simple present and simple past tenses before getting too deeply into the perfect counterparts. Although learning a language is not the same as learning a scientific subject for example, there is a lot to be said for understanding the simpler aspects, in this cases tenses, well before trying to master something more complicated.

2. The most basic and important use of present perfect, at least as compared to simple past tense, is to indicate a continuing situation, as in the ''haved lived in France'' example.

3. To a student I would say, if you are not sure whether to use simple past tense or present perfect tense, choose the simple past tense, and if you are told it is wrong ask why it is wrong.

Here I will ask you whether you speak British or North American English, because you can get different answers about present perfect tense vs simple past tense, especially from some speakers of British English who are 'overly fond' of present perfect tense.

Another example:

A: Would you like something to eat?

B: I'm not hungry. I've just had my lunch. (the past is relevant to the present) Yes, but 'I just had my lunch.' is also correct.

The person had his lunch at two. Now it is six o'clock. He may be hungry now.

A: Would you like something to eat?

B: Sure.. (the past is not relevant to the present) Of course it is! He may be hungry because he last ate four hours ago.

You have some incorrect ideas about simple past and present perfect tenses, at least as far as North American English speakers are concerned.

TS
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Hi Canadian45,

First of all thank you for your corrections. Let me tell you that I'm a teacher, though I only teach beginners and intermediate levels.

I've read more than once all your accurate and detailed explanations, and all of them seen very logical to me.

For me the main difference between the simple past and the present perfect is that the first one expresses an action that began and ended at an specific time in the past, while the present perfect generally expresses an action that began and ended at an indefinite time in the past. Of course there are more uses for the present perfect. I've found five different ones. If you want me to, I can write all of them here with the corresponding examples.

Then, which is an appropriate general explanation for the present perfect?

Which is the line, thick or small, that divides both tenses?

Here I will ask you whether you speak British or North American English, because you can get different answers about present perfect tense vs simple past tense, especially from some speakers of British English who are 'overly fond' of present perfect tense.

I've been to London and to California and studied in both places. To be honest, even though I know there are some differences, I still don't know which is which, though I know that British are more devoted to the present perfect that Canadians or Americans are. Still, I have to teach it.

Thank you once again for your time and dedication.

TS
Thinking SpainHi again,Would you agree with this one?

The present perfect is used to express a past time (that is) related to the present in some way. It can be used to that way, but simple past can also be used that way.

My stomch hurts; I (have eaten)(ate) too much.

Sometimes the past action is very recent, or it is still continuing at the present moment, This is the main way it differs from simple past tense. or we don't know exactly when the past action happened.

We only know that it happened sometime before the present. We only know that it happened sometime before now. Present perfect and simple past both can express that meaning.

'I (have) received your letter of June 26th.' Both have exactly the same meaning.

You must be a speaker of British English, because it seems that you have a very limited view of what simple past tense can express.

Is it '(that is)' absolutely necessary? At least it's much better with "that is", and even more so if read by a student of English.

TS
Hi Canadian45,

Uphs! That was fast!! Thank you.

The present perfect is used to express a past time that is related to the present in some way.

(It can be used to that way, but simple past can also be used that way.)

My stomch hurts; I (have eaten)(ate) too much. With this example I have no further questions.

Both tenses can be used without a doubt!

You must be a speaker of British English, because it seems that you have a very limited view of what simple past tense can express. Make it wider!

You are right. Here in Barcelona everybody is fond of British English, not me though. But I have to follow the line.

Nevertheless I'm an open-minded person and wishing to learn every day of my life. So, any advices coming from you, in this case, are more than welcome. Please advise me any time.

I really appreciate all your concern.

Thinking
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