Hi teachers,

Will you consider this definition as appropriate?

One of the uses of the present perfect progressive affirmative is to emphasize on the duration of actions or situations that commenced in the past and are continuing in the present.

This is possible with the prepositions since or for and a definite time marker after these prepositions.

Thanks in advance
Greetings,

some general remarks:

1. Avoid long-winded definitions. Present Perfect Progressive is in itself scary to the untrained mind, and what will be if you add 'affirmative'? Moreover, I am familiar with no such tense as 'present perfect progressive affirmative'. Even more strictly speaking, it should be: present tense perfect progressive aspect.

2. '... to emphasize _ the duration...'

3. 'This is possible...' --- 'The tense is often used with...'

The classical two-part definition is this:

1) the Present Perfect Continuous is used to denote an action which began in the past, has been going on up to the present and is still going on.

2) ... denotes an action which was recently in progress but is no longer going on at the present moment.

Respectfully, Gleb Chebrikoff
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Gleb_ChebrikoffGreetings,
Even more strictly speaking, it should be: present tense perfect progressive aspect.
I would go for " present perfect continuous".
Hi thl,

Thank you so much for the two links. They are clear and concrete.Emotion: wink

TS
Hi Gleb_Chebrikoff,
Gleb_Chebrikoff1) the Present Perfect Continuous is used to denote an action which began in the past, has been going on up to the present and is still going on.

2) ... denotes an action which was recently in progress but is no longer going on at the present moment.
I really like both of them; short and clear! Thank you so much for your advices. I really appreciate them.

Best wishes.

TS
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EnglishmannI would go for " present perfect continuous".
This is fine, too, but it is often said that the term 'progressive' is more precise, although, obviously, both terms are currently used in textbooks.