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Hello! I wasn't sure where I could ask about this, but I've always been interested in "made up" hyphenated adjectives and have been planning to use a few for something I'm working on for fun! For example:

I love Pride & Prejudice Mr Darcy's iconic line, "I have fought against my better judgment, my family's expectations, the inferiority of your birth by rank and circumstance." If I want to call something (even something silly like a curry dish my mom made, for example) that I love so much that I'd fight against my better judgment to have it, would it be right to call it "better judgment-fighting curry"? Or would that only make it sound like the curry itself is fighting its better judgment? Is there a better way to word it while still keeping the elements I wish to use?

This is all for fun, but I do plan to share some of the work it'll be part of, so I still wish to be as clear as possible! If you have any advice, I would greatly appreciate it

Additionally, is there another term for making up adjectives by combining two words? English is not my native tongue, but it is a characteristic of it that I've come to love very much so I would like to learn more about it!

Comments  
joeymangowould that only make it sound like the curry itself is fighting its better judgment?

Yes, it would. And you would need another hyphen, anyway.

joeymangoIs there a better way to word it while still keeping the elements I wish to use?

Mr Darcy's line is hardly iconic. To fight against one's better judgment is not an uncommon turn of phrase. My problem here is that it is not clear why you would have to fight against anything to eat the curry you love. I suppose you think you will get fat if you surrender to it, and on that basis, the only variation I can think of is "against-my-better-judgment curry", but that sounds like it is unpleasant to eat.

joeymangoAdditionally, is there another term for making up adjectives by combining two words? English is not my native tongue, but it is a characteristic of it that I've come to love very much so I would like to learn more about it!

English is pretty free that way, a gift from the Germanic side. Old English forever made words from descriptive phrases. You are making compound words out of whole words. When you take parts of two words and run them together, that's a special case called a portmanteau, like "smog".