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"I pay about $150 a month for rent. I like it because it’s cheap compared to other places. I used to have to work part-time, including tutoring, but since I moved here I don’t have to."

Is the underlined part correct there? Confused about the use of "since" because normally I have to use a perfect tense with it, like "since I moved here I haven't had to." (is this the right way to say it?) Is the underlined part grammatically wrong way to say it but nevertheless said in informal conversation? If I used "after I moved here I don't have to", would that be grammatically correct?
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Is the underlined part correct there?-- No.

Confused about the use of "since" because normally I have to use a perfect tense with it, like "since I moved here I haven't had to." (is this the right way to say it?-- Yes)

Is the underlined part grammatically wrong way to say it but nevertheless said in informal conversation?-- If it actually occurred, then I suppose so.

If I used "after I moved here I don't have to", would that be grammatically correct?-- No.
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Is the underlined part grammatically wrong way to say it but nevertheless said in informal conversation?-- If it actually occurred, then I suppose so.
Thanks a lot for your answers. Just a follow up question, regarding above, would you say that it is said like that often enough to be not that bothersome to native speakers when they actually hear it in an informal setting? I'd like to know if it would stick out like a sore thumb. In other words, I can't seem to gauge whether native English speakers usually or even sometimes talk like that or not, or they always consistently use the right way. Thanks.
All I can say is that it bothers me and I don't recall hearing anyone say it, but I wouldn't be surprised if someone did.
Hi,
Mkyol Confused about the use of "since" because normally I have to use a perfect tense with it, like "since I moved here
Typically, it's true. But with your passage, [you don't have to ] is your currrent status which is the same as [ you haven't had the need to] since......

This is how I interprete your short paragraph. You made reference about the new low rent and talked about how you used to work different jobs, suggesting that rent was the reason you had to take on part times jobs. You haven't had to do that anymore since you moved here. The information was quite clear. Though, I would have constructed the paragraph slightly differently to improve the syntax flow:

I am currently paying $150 a month for rent which is considerably lower than other places I used to live. Before, I had to work part time jobs to help pay the rent, including tutoring, but since I moved here, I haven't had (the need) to work part time anymore.

That's my take.
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Ok, thanks for the replies both.