+0

Might there be a context in which "He walked out on me" is meant for "He walked out to me", not "He walked out from me" ?

For example,

While I was preparing for my daughter's birthday party, my husband was doing his work in his room, and after he was done with it, he walked out on me to help me.

I know "walk out on someone" usually means "leave someone", but I think that could mean different according to context, as shown above.

If my thinking about "walk out on" is right, can these expressions mean different according to context?

  1. Rush out on

  2. Run out on

  3. Go out on

  4. Move out on

+1
fire1Might there be a context in which "He walked out on me" is meant for "He walked out to me", not "He walked out from me" ?

No.

+1

Idioms are very exact combinations of words, which have a different meaning than the individual words do. You can not substitute another word in the phrase, for example, "walk out on" has an entirely different meaning that "go out on" (e.g. This boy and I are going out on a date Friday night.)

https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/walk+out+on

Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
1 2
Comments  
GPY
fire1Might there be a context in which "He walked out on me" is meant for "He walked out to me", not "He walked out from me" ?

No.

But context makes it clear that "walked out on" does not mean "to abandon or leave" there.

And If "walked out upon/onto" is used instead, would that sentence mean clear?

fire1If my thinking about "walk out on" is right,

Excuse me GPY.

Is the word "thinking" correct in the OP? Or should it be "thought"?

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
fire1But context makes it clear that "walked out on" does not mean "to abandon or leave" there.

"walk out on someone" always means "abandon" or "leave". No amount of context will change this.

fire1And If "walked out upon/onto" is used instead, would that sentence mean clear?

No. Those would not make sense in the context.

Joseph AIs the word "thinking" correct in the OP?

Yes.

To GPY

What about this case?

‎A lot of puppies rushed out on me when I stepped into the house.

1. Does this sentence sound natural?

2. What does this sentence mean?

Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
GPYYes
Thanks a lot.
fire1‎A lot of puppies rushed out on me when I stepped into the house.

This is acceptable, I would say. It means they rushed at or towards you. "at" is clearer though.

Show more