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I have some questions:
Identify the word or phrase in parentheses that must be changed in order for the sentence to be correct:
1> The world's (rain) forests (are being) cut down at the rate ( on) 3,000 acres (per hour).
2> (Father) evidence is needed (to support) recent research which (suggests) that certain chemicals found in broccoli (may art) as cancer preventatives.
3> (Nutritional) adequacy is hard (to achieve) on a low-calorie diet; even a small person should not try to (get by on) fewer than twelve (hundreds) calories per day.
In sentence 1, I think (on) is wrong. But I really don't know what preposition can replace (on) here.
In sentence 2, I have heard that after suggest we must use a special form of verb but I don't know what form we should use.
In sentence 3, I'm stuck with " get by on", what does it mean?

Kind regards,
KhaiMinh
1 2
Comments  
1 at
2 can act
3 get by with

Don't count on me, especially on the 3-d answer, I am just a learner like you.
Darkmaster, hello!
I'll give it a try:

1. ... at the rate of ...
2. ? what/who is Father? Is it "further" ?and I guess it's "act ?
3. to get by means to manage, to go on living... there should be no -s at "hundreds"
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
As usual I didn't even look at the proper word, let alone the answers...lol
Yet I'm stuck with 2., unless 'research" should be followed by a plural... Emotion: smile
Does "farther"= "further" in English?
"research" here is not plural, according to the statement.
and "art" here is "act", sorry.
These sentences are taken from the Heinemann TOEFL Practice Tests.
Someone ( I can't remember who) told me that after suggest we had to use bare infinitive verb or should/would/might + bare infinitive verb. Was he right?
Kind regards,
KhaiMinh
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Does "farther"= "further" in English?
: yes here it's possible:

[adv] to or at a greater extent or degree or a more advanced stage (`further' is used more often than `farther' in this abstract sense); "further complicated by uncertainty about the future"; "let's not discuss it further"; "nothing could be further from the truth"; "they are further along in their research than we expected"; "the application of the law was extended farther"; "he is going no farther in his studies"
Someone ( I can't remember who) told me that after suggest we had to use bare infinitive verb or should/would/might + bare infinitive verb. Was he right?


I'm familiar with this, but in the meaning of "suggesting that something should be done", an action taken. And it doesn't seem as if your exammple has the same meaning.

Wait a bit, we'll see what the others think.
Hello

English speakers use the 'suggest that ...." in two ways.

1) suggest that (indicative/epistemic modal construct) : give a hint/imply that ...
(EX) The study suggests that the substance is/may be/can be/etc. hazardous.

2) suggest that (AmE: bare inf /BrE: should + bare inf) : propose a plan, say an opinion that ...
(EX) Bush suggested that the UN role be/should be limited in Iraq.

Farther can mean only 'greater in distance' while further both 'greater in distance' and 'more in quantity=additional'.

paco
Finally, what's the answer of the sentence 2 ?
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