+0
Hi,

A. When reading a newspaper, I think one would likely to see words or phrases or even clauses in quotation marks. How can I know when to include the article in the quotation mark portion or not.

1. At the same time, Bush called for an "enduring relationship" with Iraq that ...

Why not?

At the same time, Bush called for "an enduring relationship" with Iraq that ...

2. ... said that he was making the case for a "long presence in his grandmother's house," and he told ...

Why not?

... said that he was making the case for "a long presence in his grandmother's house," and he told ...

B. I learned from this forum that when a noun is used as an adjective, no quotation mark is usually placed around it, except the use of the adjective is out-of-ordinary (in relation to its meaning), OK. How do we know if a noun has an adjective that is a noun in form, that phrase is an acceptable phrase and I can use it knowing that it is correct?

eg,

a progress strategy

Do you think the above phrase is an acceptable or correct construction? What do I have to look for in order to decide what is correct or acceptable as a phrase of this kind?

C. How about those names of games? Should I include an arbitrary English article because the last word of the name of a game or the whole name is a word that normally has an artlcle. The name I made up is "Fire Ball"

Let us play "Fire Ball".

Or

Let us play the "Fire Ball".

Which one is right? Should I place an arbitray article before the game name "Fire Ball"?
+0
A. How can I know when to include the article in the quotation mark portion or not.-- What is within the quotes is what the person said; what is outside the quotes has been added or changed by the journalist.

B.How do we know if a noun has an adjective that is a noun in form, that phrase is an acceptable phrase and I can use it knowing that it is correct? -- You cannot without seeing it in print or in a dictionary-- but they usually are acceptable unless a generally accepted alternative already exists.

a progress strategy: Do you think the above phrase is an acceptable or correct construction?-- Yes

C. How about those names of games? Should I include an arbitrary English article because the last word of the name of a game or the whole name is a word that normally has an artlcle? No. Names of games are proper nouns, which usually take no article.

Let us play "Fire Ball"-- This is right.
Comments  
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Mister MicawberA. How can I know when to include the article in the quotation mark portion or not.-- What is within the quotes is what the person said; what is outside the quotes has been added or changed by the journalist.

Thank you, Mr. M. What possibly could be the content of what Mr. Bush's had said that justifies the placement of quotation marks around the two word phrase "enduring relationship" and exclusion of what seems to be an essential grammar part, the English article "an"?

At the same time, Bush called for an "enduring relationship" with Iraq that ...

B.How do we know if a noun has an adjective that is a noun in form, that phrase is an acceptable phrase and I can use it knowing that it is correct? -- You cannot without seeing it in print or in a dictionary-- but they usually are acceptable unless a generally accepted alternative already exists.

a progress strategy: Do you think the above phrase is an acceptable or correct construction?-- Yes

C. How about those names of games? Should I include an arbitrary English article because the last word of the name of a game or the whole name is a word that normally has an artlcle? No. Names of games are proper nouns, which usually take no article.

Let us play "Fire Ball"-- This is right.

What possibly could be the content of what Mr. Bush's had said that justifies the placement of quotation marks around the two word phrase "enduring relationship" and exclusion of what seems to be an essential grammar part, the English article "an"?
Perhaps what he actually said was something a simple as '...I am calling for a solid, unequivocal, enduring relationship with Iraq...'

Mister Micawber
What possibly could be the content of what Mr. Bush's had said that justifies the placement of quotation marks around the two word phrase "enduring relationship" and exclusion of what seems to be an essential grammar part, the English article "an"?
Perhaps what he actually said was something a simple as '...I am calling for a solid, unequivocal, enduring relationship with Iraq...'
Thank you, Mr.M.


Going back to the original question (i think), if that (the made-up quote above)is perhap what he said, then which one is the correct re-written version of his quote? Please note the placement of quotation marks. Thanks.

1. At the same time, Bush called for "a solid, unequivocal, enduring relationship" with Iraq..."

2. At the same time, Bush called for a "solid, unequivocal, enduring relationship" with Iraq..."

If you chose no.2, why didn't you place "a" inside the quoted part?

Try out our live chat room.
If I choose #1, it is because I am being careful to include his words and exclude mine. If I choose #2, I figure it makes the short quote more effective for the reader.