Hello,

First off, let me say that my questions may appear simple and I ask you to please bear with me. English is not my first language so I am kind of confused with the structure and I have a very bad problem with parallelism. Any help will be appreciated.

Are the following sentences correct in terms of the following?

Tenses

A.) I never knew you are this generous. (Should it be "were" since I used "knew" even if the person is presently generous?)

B.) And I'm saying how would that be possible if your school wasn't qualified to begin with? (Aside from the italicized word, should the sentence end with a period instead?)

C.) It'll be easier if your school has access to the site. (Or "will have access"?)

E.) It would've been easier if your school had access to the site.

F.) I never said I love you. (Or "loved"?)

G.) If I am to stay here, I will have a problem with the bills.

H.) You were exaggerating things and you know it. (Or "knew"?)

I.) I see what you did there. (Or "saw"? I am aware that this is an Internet meme.)

Grammar

H.) You could just opt not to respond. (Or "opt to not"?)

I.) It got an error.

J.) I am unaware even of the most common things. (Or "of even"?)

I apologize if I gave a lot of sentences. It's just that I want the matter to be cleared once and for all.

Thank you!
A.) I never knew you are were this generous. (Should it be "were" since I used "knew" even if the person is presently generous? Yes.)

B.) And I'm saying how would that asking how that would be possible if your school wasn't qualified to begin with. (Aside from the italicized word, should the sentence end with a period instead? Yes.)

C.) It'll be easier if your school has access to the site. (Or "will have access"?) Both OK. will makes it future.

E.) It would've been easier if your school had had had access to the site.

F.) I never said I love you. (Or "loved"?)

I never said, "I love you".

I never said (that) I love you.

I never said (that) I loved you. All can be used with the same meaning.

G.) If I am to stay here, I will have a problem with the bills. OK.

H.) You were exaggerating things and you know it. (Or "knew"?) Both OK.

I.) I see what you did there. (Or "saw"? I am aware that this is an Internet meme.)

see seems more natural to me, but saw is also possible if you're focusing on a time in the past.

H.) You could just opt not to respond. OK. (Or "opt to not"? NO!)

I.) It got an error. OK, I guess. A little strange without any context.

J.) I am unaware even of the most common things. (Or "of even"?)

Both OK. 'of even' seems more natural to my ear.

CJ
Thank you very much, CalifJim. I have a few more queries if you do not mind.
C.) It'll be easier if your school has access to the site. (Or "will have access"?) Both OK. will makes it future.
A.) It'll be easier if your school has access to the site. (Does this sentence say that it'll be easier if the school has access presently?)
B.) It'll be easier if your school will have access to the site. (What does this mean, then?)
E.) It would've been easier if your school had had access to the site.
Is there another way to rephrase this sentence without using "have been" but will still denote that it refers to the past?
H.) You were exaggerating things and you know it. (Or "knew"?) Both OK.
Is there a difference with regard to their respective meaning?
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C.) It'll be easier if your school has access to the site. (Or "will have access"?) Both OK. will makes it future.
A.) It'll be easier if your school has access to the site. (Does this sentence say that it'll be easier if the school has access presently?) Yes. Presently or in the future. You can read this one as 'has or gets access'.

B.) It'll be easier if your school will have access to the site. (What does this mean, then?) if your school is going to have access in the future; if it is projected for the future that your school will have access.
E.) It would've been easier if your school had had access to the site.
Is there another way to rephrase this sentence without using "have been" but will still denote that it refers to the past? I don't think so. I can't think of anything that fulfills those conditions except what you already have.
H.) You were exaggerating things and you know it. (Or "knew"?) Both OK.
Is there a difference with regard to their respective meaning? Yes, of course. In the case of 'know' you're saying that the other person now knows, on looking back at it, something about the past exaggeration. In the case of 'knew' you're saying that the other person then knew (at that previous time) something about the exaggeration. The first case focuses on present time; the second case focuses on past time.

CJ
Thank you for taking the time to answer each and every question. You're a great help!