Here are some literature questions from the book sense and sensibility that i need help in, so please help me.

1. The author spends several pages on the discussion between John and Fanny, during which Fanny convinces her husband to forgo his promise to provide for the Dashwood ladies. What does this conversation reveal about these two characters? Why does the author spend so much time on this conversation?

2. Elinor and Marianne reveal some of the differences in their temperament upon their departure from Norland. Compare how Elinor and Marianne feel and behave upon leaving Norland. Be sure to discuss specific examples of their behavior?

3. After Marianne spends the morning at Allenham with Willoughby, Elinor says: “I am afraid…that the pleasantness of an employment does not always evince its propriety.” This quote indicates that Elinor’s sense of propriety and Marianne’s sensibility come into conflict regarding Willoughby. Explain why Elinor is bothered by Marianne’s behavior and compare Marianne’s praise of Willoughby with Elinor’s earlier praise of Edward.

4. Mrs. Palmer often contradicts herself; for example, when speaking of Willoughby, she says, “I know him extremely well…not that I ever spoke to him, indeed; but I have seen him for ever in town.” She also says that although Colonel Brandon didn’t verbally confirm that Marianne and Willoughby will be married: “…he looked as if he knows it to be true, so from that moment I set it down as certain.” Through her descriptions of Mrs. Palmer’s speech and behavior, as well as through Elinor’s analysis of evidence, what is the author saying about her views of gossip and people’s use of language?

These next 4 questions are from the story and the passage of the story.
Read the passage that's in bold.

After leaving the ball, Marianne and Elinor have an important conversation about suffering. Read the passage and then answer the questions that follow.
"Poor Elinor! how unhappy I make you!"
"I only wish," replied her sister, "there were any thing I could do, which might be of comfort to you."
This, as every thing else would have been, was too much for Marianne, who could only exclaim, in the anguish of her heart, "Oh! Elinor, I am miserable, indeed," before her voice was entirely lost in sobs.
Elinor could no longer witness this torrent of unresisted grief in silence.
"Exert yourself, dear Marianne," she cried, "if you would not kill yourself and all who love you. Think of your mother; think of her misery while you suffer: for her sake you must exert yourself."
"I cannot, I cannot," cried Marianne; "leave me, leave me, if I distress you; leave me, hate me, forget me! but do not torture me so. Oh! how easy for those, who have no sorrow of their own to talk of exertion! Happy, happy Elinor, you cannot have an idea of what I suffer."
"Do you call me happy, Marianne? Ah! if you knew!—And can you believe me to be so, while I see you so wretched!"
"Forgive me, forgive me," throwing her arms round her sister's neck; "I know you feel for me; I know what a heart you have; but yet you are—you must be happy; Edward loves you—what, oh what, can do away such happiness as that?"
"Many, many circumstances," said Elinor, solemnly.
"No, no, no," cried Marianne wildly, "he loves you, and only you. You can have no grief."
"I can have no pleasure while I see you in this state."
"And you will never see me otherwise. Mine is a misery which nothing can do away."
"You must not talk so, Marianne. Have you no comforts? no friends? Is your loss such as leaves no opening for consolation?”


5. What does Elinor mean when she says “exert yourself, dear Marianne”? To whose well-being does she appeal?

6. What is ironic about Marianne’s statement: “Oh! how easy for those, who have no sorrow of their own to talk of exertion! Happy, happy Elinor, you cannot have an idea of what I suffer"? What does it reveal about Marianne?

7. Give one more example of Elinor’s sense and Marianne’s sensibility from this passage and explain the example.

8. Elinor says to Marianne:
The composure of mind with which I have brought myself at present to consider the matter, the consolation that I have been willing to admit, have been the effect of constant and painful exertion;—they did not spring up of themselves;—they did not occur to relieve my spirits at first.—No, Marianne.—Then, if I had not been bound to silence, perhaps nothing could have kept me entirely—not even what I owed to my dearest friends—from openly showing that I was very unhappy.
Based on this quotation, explain what sense has required of Elinor and what we learn about Elinor’s feelings. How does Elinor and Marianne’s relationship change after all.
Hi,
Welcome to the Forum.

Sorry, but we don't do the work for you. The way this works is that you need to try to write your answers first. Then show us your answer, and we'll try to help you with comments.

My advice to you is to keep your posts short, eg one question per post. No-one here wants to answer a single big long list of questions.

Best wishes, Clive
This isnt a question i was just wondering is this right for question 5
1. What does Elinor mean when she says “exert yourself, dear Marianne”? To whose well-being does she appeal?

Answer: When Elinor says “exert yourself” she is saying the Marianne needs to try and pull it together so she won’t make those around her feel unhappy to. She is worried about the well-being of those around Marianne.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

Mrs. Palmer often contradicts herself; for example, when speaking of Willoughby, she says, “I know him extremely well…not that I ever spoke to him, indeed; but I have seen him for ever in town.” She also says that although Colonel Brandon didn’t verbally confirm that Marianne and Willoughby will be married: “…he looked as if he knows it to be true, so from that moment I set it down as certain.” Through her descriptions of Mrs. Palmer’s speech and behavior, as well as through Elinor’s analysis of evidence, what is the author saying about her views of gossip and people’s use of language?