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On a message board I frequent, somebody made a post asking for help designing a new computer they wanted to build. One of the first replies was simply "queue Johnny" as Johnny is somebody who frequently answers these types of questions.

I am convinced that he should have said "cue Johnny" and I gave him definitions of both words to prove this, but he insists that he meant to use "queue" and that it is correct. I am hoping somebody here could shed more light on the matter.
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Hi,

A 'cue' in the theatre is a stage signal. Thus, 'to cue someone' means to give them a stage signal, eg to make an entrance.

That's why we say 'Cue Johnny'. In your context, it means 'it's time for Johnny to come and deal with these questions'.

Best wishes, Clive
This is from dictionary.com:

queue
n.
A line of waiting people or vehicles.

Common usage has been known to take nouns and turn them into verbs.

When we need to look up information online, we now often say we'll "google it."

We also say "I'll phone you" when we tell someone we'll call them using a telephone or a cellphone.

Johnny is someone who receives a lot of questions and needs some time to answer all of them; so a line starts forming -- a line of questions and requests for help.

The word "queue" in his case may have meant: If you want Johnny to answer your question, get in line. He is very busy and has a lot of messages to respond to.

Odd usage, though. Wouldn't it have been easier to just say "ask Johnny" or "message Johnny"?

I've grown to understand that I.T. people have their own terminology when they talk shop.

Hope that helps,

Arvin
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ArvsworldThe word "queue" in his case may have meant: If you want Johnny to answer your question, get in line. He is very busy and has a lot of messages to respond to.

(Wouldn't that have been "queue for Johnny"? As it stands, if "queue" does mean "queue", it would seem to imply that Johnny himself should queue.)

MrP
I suppose it would have been. As in "wait in line for Johnny?"

Queue Johnny = Repost your help request in Johnny's queue.
I see – you mean as in "(The) Queue (named) Johnny"; or "The Johnny Queue".

MrP
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Hi.

Expressions in the form 'Cue Johnny', which I discussed earlier, are so common that my feeling is that you guys are overlooking the most likely explanation. Emotion: stick out tongue

Clive
I fear you all may be missing the pun that is being communicated.

It may very well have been an indication to receive a response as in 'cue a response from Johnny', however, the OP did state that it was regarding a post on designing a new computer.

Queues are often used in computing and programming, so saying 'queue Johnny' instead is a bit of a play on words.
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