Someone who would have a quick look at this?? ;-)

Greetings from Denmark, Chistina..

Queen Victoria herself, was a typical Victorian woman. The historian G.M. Trevelyan describes her as a queen with great dignity, but also as a rather regular mother, wife and widow, who would have felt home in every little parlour. This can be one of the reasons why regular people understood her that well during her enjoyments and sorrows, and they loved and admired her. In spite of her role as a queen, she was not that far from millions of her female subjects.
Seems to be OK...

I'd change a few things, but there aren't serious mistakes, or if there are, I didn't see them... Emotion: big smile
Okay, would you mention the few things?? ;-)
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Odense
Someone who would have a quick look at this?? ;-)

Greetings from Denmark, Chistina..

Queen Victoria was a clear example of what we call a Victorian woman. The historian G.M. Trevelyan describes her as a queen gifted of great dignity, but also as a rather ordinary mother, wife and widow, who would have felt home in every little parlour. This could explain why people understood her that well during her enjoyments and sorrows, feeling the very joy and pain she felt herself, and why she was so loved and admired. In spite of her role as a queen, she has never been too far from millions of her female subjects.

That's how I'd write it... Emotion: wink Thanks for your attention,

=YoHf=

Very little needs changing, Odense:

"Queen Victoria was herself a typical Victorian woman. The historian G.M. Trevelyan describes her as a queen who had great dignity, but was also a rather ordinary mother, wife and widow, who would have felt at home in every parlour. This may be why ordinary people sympathised so greatly with her joys and sorrows, and why they loved and admired her so much. In spite of the fact that she was queen, she was not that far in spirit from millions of her female subjects."

MrP