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Hi, can someone tell me if the word which is a relative pronoun in this sentence? If so, then is it a defining or a non-defining relative pronoun?

I remember that in my early childhood education, our teachers assigned us projects in which all the kids were required to collectively brainstorm solutions to various problems.

Thank you!

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I remember that in my early childhood education, our teachers assigned us projects in which all the kids were required to collectively brainstorm solutions to various problems.


Yes, "which" is a relative pronoun.

When we talk of 'defining' or 'non-defining', we are referring to the whole relative clause, not just the relative pronoun. In your example, the relative clause is a defining one modifying "projects".

Note that "which" can occur in non-defining relatives, as well as defining ones.



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Ok, excellent Bill, thank you so much for clearing this up! Emotion: smile

Bill, I have one more question. Could you please answer it?

Is this correct?

Such cooperation can prepare students to be good team players and understand the value of other people’s perspectives.

Or should it be "...players and to understand..."

Or would both versions be correct?

Thank you!

[1] Such cooperation can prepare students to [ be good team players ] and [ understand the value of other people’s perspectives ] .

[2] Such cooperation can prepare students [ to be good team players ] and [ to understand the value of other people’s perspectives ].


Both versions are correct, and are coordinative constructions, but there is a slight grammatical difference.

In [1] the coordination consists of two verb phrases, as bracketed. Note that the subordinator "to" is outside the coordination, from where it introduces the two VPs separately.

In [2] the coordination consists of two clauses (including "to"), each serving as complement of "prepare".


Note that these are called 'catenative' constructions, a special kind where two or more verbs form a 'chain', possibly separated by just a noun phrase, as here. In both [1] and [2] the intervening noun phrase "students" is the grammatical object of "prepare", but it is only the semantic (understood) subject of the catenative clause(s).

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