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Hi

Could you please tell me if I understand the following correctly?

QUIET DOWN = transitive verb

QUIETEN DOWN = intransitive verb

The mother was trying to quiet down the crying baby. or

The mother was quieting down the crying baby.

but

The crying baby didn't quieten down the whole night.

Thanks,

Tom
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You have the collocation as both "quieten down" and "quieting down." "Quieten" is not correct, although people casually drop the "g" in conversation.
Good! They're finally quietin' down!
Mr. TomThe mother was trying to quiet down the crying baby. or fine

The mother was quieting down the crying baby. fine

but

The crying baby didn't quieten down the whole night. The crying baby didn't quiet down the whole night. I'd say "to quiet down" is a compound verb which may be used both transitively and intransitively.

The tricky thing is that when you get into the exotic tenses (my term Emotion: big smile) only the "main verb" changes.
They finally quieted down. (simple past)
They'll be quieting down in a few minutes. (future continuous)
Last time I checked, they still hadn't quieted down. (past perfect)
Thanks, Avangi!

So, which sounds more natural to you?

Would you please quiet down?

Would you please quieten down?

Tom
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There's no such word as "quieten."
This example is an imperative sentence. It's like "Please stop." You use the bare infinitive, or the root form, or whatever you call it.

"Please quiteing down!" is like sayng "Please stopping!"

When you try to figure these things out, try substituting "stop" for "quiet down." Do the same thing to "quiet" that you do to "stop."

They finally stopped. They finally quieted down. (ed)

I think they're stopping. I think they're quieting down. (ing)

They didn't stop. They didn't quiet down. (base form)
They hadn't stopped. They hadn't quieted down. (past participle - same form as simple past)
I am grateful, Avangi! Last question:

Am I to understand that Americans don't use "quieten" at all? And the word is used mainly in British English?

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/quieten

Tom
Sorry about that, Mr. Tom! I swear I never heard that word in 73 years as a native speaker of English! Emotion: embarrassed

How do they use it in BrE?? Can you give me an example?

Hmmm. I guess you just did - at the very bottom of your reference:

Somehow I managed to quieten her down.

Boy, that sounds strange to me! Emotion: rolleyes

So since it's used here as an infinitive, we can assume that "quieten" is the base form. I wonder what the other forms are? Present participle "quietening"?
Yes, that's what it says. (I'm gradually waking up! )
It also says at the beginning of your reference that it's both transitive and intransitive.

I'll have to start reading more British authors. Had I come across it in Shakespeare, I would have assumed it was archaic.
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Mr. TomThanks, Avangi!

So, which sounds more natural to you?

Would you please quiet down?

Would you please quieten down?

Tom

To me, the first one.
Mr. Tom Could you please tell me if I understand the following correctly?

QUIET DOWN = transitive verb Both transitive and intransitive

QUIETEN DOWN = intransitive verb Both transitive and intransitive

Hi,

Quieten is a standard part of my lexicon.

It's amazing we can understand each other at all, isn't it?

They seem to undertand the word in Iceland.

http://www.icenews.is/index.php/2010/04/21/icelandic-volcano-continues-to-quieten-down /

Icelandic volcano continues to quieten down

Clive
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