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The former Springbok prop was hardly the quickest on his feet last night

Other examples( or put in google,  site:*.co.uk "quickest on * feet)

Does that mean they can learn very quickly by themselves?

Thanks
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I'd say, "No, it refers to skills already acquired." It probably refers to athletes in general, but I tend to think of it in terms of indoor sports, like dancing, boxing, and basketball. It refers specifically to agility of footwork (obviously). I believe I've also heard it used figuratively to describe mental agility, particularly in a competitive way - quickness, balance.

Edit. I'd say it applies uniquely to one outdoor sport - soccer.
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To be quick on your feet - agile, fast

It is also used metaphorically (but not in this case).

Did you understand that the player was being criticised here? They were saying that he was being too slow. Note the use of 'hardly' - that word creates this meaning.
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Yes, I think it's primarily a sporting term, although the reference here is specifically to rugby rather than soccer; a 'prop' is a positional term used in rugby, but not in football (soccer). I think too, it is sometimes used metaphorically for mental agility/quick thinking.
 nona the brit's reply was promoted to an answer.
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To be quick on your feet - agile, fast

It is also used metaphorically (but not in this case).

Did you understand that the player was being criticised here? They were saying that he was being too slow. Note the use of 'hardly' - that word creates this meaning.
Thank you all!

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