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I was going through a quiz section at the usingenglish website and came upon a couple of questions that I was so sure of. Help.

Q1 - We need someone with ___ knowledge of Chinese.

The answer is "a good" and I want to know why that is. Why not "the good"? I think the word "knowledge" is uncountable.

Q3 - They have ____ distrust of the authorities.

The answer is "a deep." Why is that? I think the dictionary indicated that it is "aN" which I think it means a noun that usually accompanies the article "a".

Q5 - The school gave me ___ education.

The answer is "a good." Why not just "good education" without any article? I think education is a variable noun.

Q7 - She has ____ understanding of the subject.

The answer is "a good." Why not "the good" if the word "understanding" is being restricted by the phrase "of the subject"?
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Thank you so much.

Previously, I have asked whether the following two sentences wouldn't pass the test and I think you alluded?? that Yes that they would not. I think the following sentences do not have any descriptive adjective in the front of them and don't have anything after them to get the notion that they are written to mean a kind of something.

They have a distrust. and She has an understanding.

Fine. How are they different with your last sentence "She had a happiness in her heart that morning."

Are you going to say that the happiness there is a particular kind of happiness that she had in her heart and the one she had that morning?
Hi again,

I think the following sentences do not have any descriptive adjective in the front of them and don't have anything after them to get the notion that they are written to mean a kind of something.

They have a distrust. and She has an understanding.

Fine. How are they different with your last sentence "She had a happiness in her heart that morning."

Are you going to say that the happiness there is a particular kind of happiness that she had in her heart and the one she had that morning? Yes, I am.

If you walk into the room and tell me, 'I saw Mary last Wednesday. She had a happiness in her heart that morning," I can see a meaning in what you say. But if you say 'I saw Mary last Wednesday. She had a happiness that morning," I don't know what you mean.

Best wishes, Clive
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Thank you, again.

1. OK, if I say this, can you see a meaning in this (I just added what looks to be a descriptive adjective)?

I saw Mary last Wednesday. She had a great/wonderful happiness that morning.

2. If you see this sentence without any context, would say it makes sense or would you be asking for more information from me?

I had a great happiness.

I had a great happiness this morning.

I think what I am trying to ask is whether it is possible and acceptable to just add a descriptive adjective in front of a noun in a sentence that had no prior linkage in terms of context and have it stand on its own? If you had those two sentences above without any prior context for them, would you accept them as being valid? Like here:

I had a lousy uneasiness.

I think it is better to provide more context?? by following it with a phrase like "in my mind" but can it stand on its own like this?

I had a lousy uneasiness in my mind this morning.

If I had set up a context before the sentence was to be shown or written or there was an intrinsic understanding of what it means, can that be enough for it to stand on its own?

I Thank you for your anticipated response.
Hi,

1. OK, if I say this, can you see a meaning in this (I just added what looks to be a descriptive adjective)?

I saw Mary last Wednesday. She had a great/wonderful happiness that morning.

This is awkward and seems wrong because you wouldn't say 'she had . . happiness' of any kind, you'd say 'she was (very) happy'.

2. If you see this sentence without any context, would say it makes sense or would you be asking for more information from me?

I had a great happiness.

I had a great happiness this morning.

Again, it's awkward to use 'had'. However, putting that aside, you need to tell me more about what has caused this happiness.

I think what I am trying to ask is whether it is possible and acceptable to just add a descriptive adjective in front of a noun in a sentence that had no prior linkage in terms of context and have it stand on its own? If you had those two sentences above without any prior context for them, would you accept them as being valid? Like here:

I had a lousy uneasiness.

I think it is better to provide more context?? Yes, definitely. by following it with a phrase like "in my mind" but can it stand on its own like this?

I had a lousy uneasiness in my mind this morning.

If I had set up a context before the sentence was to be shown or written or there was an intrinsic understanding of what it means, can that be enough for it to stand on its own? Yes.

Yesterday, Mary felt a great happiness in her heart. Her lover, whom she thought was dead, came home from the war.

Best wishes, Clive