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I get it that you are disappointed.

Is the "it" a raised object in the sentence above?

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anonymous

I get it that you are disappointed.

Is the "it" a raised object in the sentence above?

No. This is a case of object extraposition.

Here's another example:

I find it strange that he danced on the table.

from *I find that he danced on the table strange.

I might say that your example has a superfluous object extraposition because 'it' can be omitted. (I don't know if linguists have developed a special terminology for such cases.)

I get it that you are disappointed.
I get that you are disappointed.

Cf.
I understand it that you are disappointed.
I understand that you are disappointed.

CJ

Object raising is more like this:

*John wants that she should go away. (Not very "English".)
John wants her to go away. (Subject she in the previous sentence becomes, i.e., is raised to, object her in this sentence.)

Some scholars doubt that object raising even exists. They have developed other ways of analyzing such cases.

CJ

Comments  
anonymous

I get it that you are disappointed.

Is the "it" a raised object in the sentence above?

I'll explain what a raised object is. Take this example:

Pat intended Liz to interview both candidates.

Here, "Liz" is not an argument of "intend". The situation simply involves one who has the intention (Pat) and the content of the intention (that Liz interview both candidates).

We thus have three complements but only two arguments: "Liz" is thus a raised object.

In other words, the verb that Pat relates to syntactically is higher in the constituent structure than the one it relates to semantically.