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Not for mathematicians among themselves, but it is about what you can expect when a mathematician tries to explain the ... layman. And indeed, unlike French or English, Dutch sadly lacks one-letter words, which make a pi-rhyme in Dutch very difficult.

What's a pi-rhyme?

Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)

Nu, who's calling prunes "dried plums"?

Supermarkets everywhere.

Everywhere?

Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)
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Anyway, French doesn't even have words for toe or potato.

Really ? But Brits have no word for "jouïr".

Rejoice? Cum?

Harlan Messinger
Remove the first dot from my e-mail address.
Veuillez ôter le premier point de mon adresse de courriel.
Not every animal, or even most: chicken/chicken, duck/duck, fish/fish, shrimp/shrimp, etc.

Unless my belly has been lying to me, there are several different kinds of fish (canned, pecan encrusted) and duck (Peking, shot by neighbor).

What does that have to do with whether we use different words for the animal and for its flesh?
But only one kind of chicken and shrimp (different sizes).

Harlan Messinger
Remove the first dot from my e-mail address.
Veuillez ôter le premier point de mon adresse de courriel.
Had anyone ever tried to import and widely market Chinese gooseberries?

There's quite a bit about the histories of various crops on the Web.
I'd occasionally seen a picture of a gooseberry, but it never occurred to me that a kiwi was a kind of gooseberry.

It's not. You can't assume anything from common names.

http://gears.tucson.ars.ag.gov/book/chap7/chinese.html The name "gooseberry" is derived from the similarity in the taste of the fruit, not to a botanical relationship to Ribes spp. (Menninger 1 966).

Best Donna Richoux
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... A valiant effort, but he's called "St. Jerome" in English. The only Hieronymus I know of is Bosch.

Actually, it seems like you perfectly well know about Bosch's namesake, Hieronymus, Doctor of the Church, translator of the Vulgate, etc.

He's called St. Jerome in English.

Harlan Messinger
Remove the first dot from my e-mail address.
Veuillez ôter le premier point de mon adresse de courriel.
Unless my belly has been lying to me, there are several different kinds of fish (canned, pecan encrusted) and duck (Peking, shot by neighbor).

What does that have to do with whether we use different words for the animal and for its flesh?

But only one kind of chicken and shrimp (different sizes).

Fowl has fallen out of popular usage, but it is still around.

Did people eat shrimp/prawns around the time of the Norman invasion?

Izzy
I think that you might occasionally see it as "patates ... few shops selling "Vlaamse frieten", but we call it "patat".

The pommes frites sold in trendy Manhattan neighborhoods are shaped like McDonalds fries (square columns of potato), but more slender.

In that case they are not Belgian. McDonalds fries are slender compared to those of the inventors, the "Vlaamse frieten".
Perhaps this was a variation that already existed in Belgium, and the entrepreneurs figured the familiar shape would be more readily accepted in the New York market?

There is indeed an entrepreneur with marketing ideas.
dik t. winter, cwi, kruislaan 413, 1098 sj amsterdam, nederland, +31205924131 home: bovenover 215, 1025 jn amsterdam, nederland; http://www.cwi.nl/~dik/
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That's right. In Spanish we do not have different words ... is required, we add "de la mano" or "del pie".

And we have "meñique" for "little finger". I must confess I've never understood what's the logic of having different words for fingers and toes while not having a name for the little finger. I find distinguishing between fingers is of more practical importance than bothering to give a special name to toes; after all, toes are just smaller versions of fingers and most of the time they are 'useless'. In fact, I've never felt any need for a special word for toes, adding "del pie" does just fine for me because seldom I've needed to refer to them specifically as opposed to fingers. While I'd very much welcome having not just "pulgar" and "meñique", but also specific words for the other three fingers instead of saying "dedo índice", "dedo corazón" and "dedo anular".
You make up for it with oído* and *oreja, though ( the Q-tippable and sticky-out bits, respectively, of ears)

But we lack a word for nostril, which is just "el orificio de la nariz", :-\. Although I recall having found it weird to have a special word for it when I first learnt about English "nostril".
and you also neatly distinguish between pelo* and *vello (head and body hair).

To refer specifically to head hair, we say "cabello". "Vello" refers primarily to the shorter and softer kind of hair characteristic of body hair as opposed to the longer and harder ones characteristic of head hair ("cabello"), and the word may be used also for bloom on fruit. "Pelo" is unspecific like English "hair" and we say both "pelo corporal" and "pelo de la cabeza", although most usually when people talk about their "pelo" they refer to their "cabello", just like in English. In this respect, "vello" and "cabello" have a somewhat more formal/literary feel than "pelo".
Cheers,
Javier
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