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Nu, who's calling prunes "dried plums"?

Sunsweet, for example: http://www.sunsweet.com/gifts.cfm?price=0%2C5 The page cited seems to use both "prunes" and "dried plums" for plain prunes, but prunes ... their Orange Essence Dried Plums. Very weird. Smell like oranges and taste like prunes. I liked them a lot, though.)

Not a bad marketing idea to come up with a new lexical item for a new product.
It seems odd that you can taste a taste different from the smell you smell, since most of "taste" is smell anyway.
Welch's has a new line of blended fruit juices, with commercials with a very small boy saying he can taste both flavors at once. Can anyone verify the claim? (The stuff is too expensive almost twice the price of orange juice for me to experiment.)

Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)
There's no system or tendency to it, and it goes ... and "chouette," where ordinary English makes no distinction at all.

In French, paper clips and trombones are both "trombones". Go figure.

In English, another brasswind instrument and a snack cracker are both "bugles." Go figure.

Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)
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It's a similar owl story in Spanish, where they distingiush ... a storage space with a door) is just an armario.

Early and late fig crops remind me of early and late rains, which have different words in Biblical Hebrew (yore and malkosh, resp. Or irresp. I forget which). And, of course, there are 3,434,254,367,834 words for 'snow' in Eskimo. (J/k.)

I'd like to see the lexicon that lists them all!
Richard Steiner has a new monograph on three words in the book of Amos, having to do with figiculture.
An advance over his two previous monographs, which dealt with one consonant each.

Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)
I doubt that any two French speakers will agree with ... one species of penguin. Where did you get this from?

I couldn't possibly tell you, but I seem to have been wrong. Hmm. And there's a character on fr.lettres.langue.francaise whose moniker is "Nestor le pingouin". Now I have to change my mental image of him.

Is he abusive?

Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)
Restoring half the quote:
Apparently. The (oldish) bilingual that I use glosses it 'irregular, improper, contrary to rule or usage; excessive'.

None of which would seem to apply to naming antarctic birds!

My French-English dictionaries agree that "abusif" can mean "Grammatically improper" or "contrary to usage, wrong." Somebody, the 1950s Petit Larousse, was trying to say that the Antarctic bird shouldn't be called a "pingouin" because it wasn't one, in their view of things. Like benlizross said, they felt that the name "pingouin" should be reserved for auks.

ETYMOLOGY: Possibly from Welsh pen gwyn, White Head (name of an island in Newfoundland), great auk :
pen, chief, head + gwynn, white

Best wishes Donna Richoux
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Intuitively I do think that English uses separate terms more often where German prefers compounds, although there are for sure ... short (optimally one-syllable) words as a culprit. That's just a hypothesis, as I haven't got around to a quantitative analysis.

I know only a sprinkling of German, but I've been learning Dutch for some time. From what I've gathered, every time you need to put a noun in front of a noun to modify it, in Dutch, you make it into a compound. So what in English would be "horse race" and "raincoat factory" and "hospital insurance" wind up being the equivalent of "horserace," "raincoatfactory," and "hospitalinsurance." (Unless there happened to be some other, simpler word that meant that phrase, of course.) Grammatically, you simply can't do otherwise. You just don't find loose attributive nouns floating around in front other nouns.

I don't think the feel of how these noun phrases work is really any different than English, but the way they are written is. You write them without a space. And if a word is a bunch of letters between two spaces, then...
I'll tell you what's odd, though, is that there are other places where I would expect compounding and the Dutch don't do it. In sentences like "In the never to be forgotten movie..." Somehow they don't see any need to tie together phrases like "never-to-be-forgotten."

Best Donna Richoux
There's no system or tendency to it, and it goes ... and "chouette," where ordinary English makes no distinction at all.

There's a curious situation with the French words "chameau" and "dromadaire." If you use the word "chameau" when referring to a dromedary (an Arabian camel), French people will tend to correct you. "Chameau," they insist, is the two-humped camel (the Bactrian camel).

Same as in Spanish: "camello" and "dromedario".
However, the word "chameau" is traditionally used in French translations of the Bible when the camel in question would presumably ... to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God."

No, it was not a camel nor a dromedary. There was a mistake by St. Hyeronimus in his translation of the Gospels from Greek to Latin. The Greek word used was "kamilos" (thick rope), but it was understood as "kame:los" (camel). So, the translation should be:
"And again I say unto you, It is easier for a rope to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God."


Saludos cordiales
Javi
Mood conjugation:
I enjoy a drop
You never say no
He is an alcoholic
(Craig Brown)
Intuitively I do think that English uses separate terms more ... hypothesis, as I haven't got around to a quantitative analysis.

I know only a sprinkling of German, but I've been learning Dutch for some time. From what I've gathered, every ... is. You write them without a space. And if a word is a bunch of letters between two spaces, then...

Quite so. English has compoundnounsyndrome just the same as the other flavours of Germanic, but the orthography is terribly misleading about it.
Not noticing this is a very important ingredient in pretending that English got all creoled-up by the Normans, or that "compound" in "compound noun" is an adjective, though, so don't expect to convince everyone anytime soon.

Des
's spellingreformproposals would probably be less popular than most
"(T)he structural trend in linguistics which took root with the International Congresses of the twenties and early thirties had close and effective connections with phenomenology in its Husserlian and Hegelian versions." Roman Jakobson
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I couldn't possibly tell you, but I seem to have ... Now I have to change my mental image of him.

Is he abusive?

He can be if he feels one has been "abusif" of France or the French language. His full identifier (I previously gave a shortened version) is "Nestor le pingouin pour la France", so you can imagine his sentiments on the subject.
I'm sure there's a story behind this, and it's probably been discussed at length in f.l.l.f. (the word "palmipède" comes up from time to time as an apparent allusion to a bit of f.l.l.f. lore), but I never followed it.
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