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What's that, Canadian or something?

I don't think so. They both are in my small, and not very good, Cuyas French-Spanish dictionary. What dictionary are you using? I ask in order to know which dictionary not to buy.

I didn't look in a dictionary; I learned 40+ years ago "doigt de pied" and "pomme de terre."

Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)
Is "abusif" a faux ami? I don't see how a bird name could be caconymic. Anyway, French doesn't even have words for toe or potato.

"Toe" is "orteil". You may be thinking of Spanish, which I think has "dedo de pie".

That's right. In Spanish we do not have different words for "finger" and "toe": they both are "dedos"; if precission is required, we add "de la mano" or "del pie".
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"Toe" is "orteil". You may be thinking of Spanish, which I think has "dedo de pie".

That's right. In Spanish we do not have different words for "finger" and "toe": they both are "dedos"; if precission is required, we add "de la mano" or "del pie".

You make up for it with oído* and *oreja, though ( the Q-tippable and sticky-out bits, respectively, of ears), and you also neatly distinguish between pelo* and *vello (head and body hair).

Ross Howard
I don't think so. They both are in my small, ... ask in order to know which dictionary not to buy.

Petit Larousse (1959) :
ORTEIL n.m. (lat. articulus , jointure). Doigt du pied, et spécialem. le gros doigt, quón appelle aussi gros orteil .
PATATE n.f. (esp. batate ). Plante cultivée en Amérique tropical et en Chine pour sa racine comestible à tubercules (Familie des convolvulacées.)// Cette racine. // Fam. Pomme de terre.

In other words, for PL patate means in the first instance what we would call a sweet potato, but is informally used for potato.

Interestingly, a more recent small Eng/Fr dictionary, while giving only "pomme de terre" as a translation for "potato", translates "patate" as "spud". They also give "(pommes de terre) frites" for "french fries", where I seemed to recall hearing only "(patates) frites".

Ross Clark
and "penguin" and speech. "Toe" is "orteil". You may be thinking of Spanish, which I think has"dedo de pie".

Nope, I don't know any Spanish. Doigt de pied.

Never hoid of it. I see that it exists, but I never heard of it. FWIW it gets 394 AltaVista hits versus almost 11,000 for "orteil".
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That's right. In Spanish we do not have different words ... precission is required, we add "de lamano" or "del pie".

You make up for it with oído* and *oreja, though ( the Q-tippable and sticky-out bits, respectively, of ears), and you also neatly distinguish between pelo* and *vello (head and body hair).

French does too, BUT "poil" goes with body hair (and individual hairs in general), while "cheveux" is for head hair (though for the singular I think they usually fall back on "poil", even though "cheveu" exists).
Petit Larousse (1959) : ORTEIL n.m. (lat. articulus , jointure). Doigt du pied, et spécialem. le gros ... en Chine pour sa racine comestible à tubercules (Familie des convolvulacées.)// Cette racine. // Fam. Pomme de terre.

Gack, they give you consumption! Now that's abusive.
In other words, for PL patate means in the first instance what we would call a sweet potato, but is ... "spud". They also give "(pommes de terre) frites" for "french fries", where I seemed to recall hearing only "(patates) frites".

The Belgian fries places that sprouted all over the Village & East Village over the last few years call them "pommes frites." (And one of the dipping sauces offered is "mayonnaise," which has nothing to do with Hellman's.)

Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)
Intuitively I do think that English uses separate terms more ... hypothesis, as I haven't got around to a quantitative analysis.

I know only a sprinkling of German, but I've been learning Dutch for some time. From what I've gathered, every ... of "horserace," "raincoatfactory," and "hospitalinsurance." (Unless there happened to be some other, simpler word that meant that phrase, of course.)

Now that you put it this way it appears a bit surprising that it wouldn't be rain coat factory.
Grammatically, you simply can't do otherwise. You just don't find loose attributive nouns floating around in front other nouns. I ... is. You write them without a space. And if a word is a bunch of letters between two spaces, then...

Yes, and in some cases the compound word
acquires an additional letter 's' between the parts. ('scheepvaart', but 'scheepsbeschuit')
I'll tell you what's odd, though, is that there are other places where I would expect compounding and the Dutch don't do it. In sentences like "In the never to be forgotten movie..." Somehow they don't see any need to tie together phrases like "never-to-be-forgotten."

You can use both 'de onvergetelijke film' and
'een film om nooit te vergeten'.
The 'nooit te vergeten film' would be correct,
but cumbersome and unusual.
You could suspect a speaker using the phrase
of not being native.
Best,
Jan
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I know only a sprinkling of German, but I've been ... wind up being the equivalent of "horserace," "raincoatfactory," and "hospitalinsurance."

Oh, I sure count the English ones as compounds, too, I don"t care for a few space marks in the ... is just "belegtes Brot" (roughly "bread with something laid on it"), to quote the first example that comes to mind.

The absence of spaces does make the hyphenation problem in languages like German and Dutch
far more difficult than it is in English though.
Another consequence is that there is no such thing as a longest word in Dutch.
Words can in principle have infinite (1) length.
'Opperlands" by Battus gives some examples,
Jan
(1) Infinite in the mathematical sense:
given a number of letters you can invent a word that is longer. 20- or 30 letter words are not uncommon.
They even occur in spell-checking dictionaries.
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